Hereinafter

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Abilona1943, Feb 7, 2007.

  1. Abilona1943 New Member

    UK English
    I am part of a group updating some club rules.
    The original document uses the word "hereinafter" a couple of times at the start, so that long titles can be abbreviated in the rest of the document. Can anyone suggest a more natural way of phrasing?
    "Hereafter" seems to me to be a slight improvement, but perhaps there are a few short words that would serve even better?
     
  2. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Welcome to WR, Abilona1943. :)

    Subsequently?

    I can't think of anything shorter.

    LRV
     
  3. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    "Hereafter" and "hereinafter" mean two different things.

    "Hereafter" - from this point forward in time
    "Hereinafter" - within (this document), from this point forward in the text

    To say, "The Automobile Club of South Highgate Lane, hereafter referred to as ACSHL" would imply that the members would be actually calling the club ACSHL from that point forward in time, which is not what you want to say, I think.
     
  4. la reine victoria Senior Member

    I've just thought of "thence".

    Any use?

    LRV
     
  5. sloopjc Senior Member

    UK English
    If these are club rules, I see nothing wrong with the more formal and correct, "hereinafter" as JM says.
     
  6. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    To me, "hereinafter" is a wonderfully succinct word. To communicate what it says in other words would be much longer, i.e., "in the remainder of this document". If you're going to shorten it, I'd go with "herein", if anything.
     
  7. winklepicker

    winklepicker Senior Member

    Kent
    English (UK)
    How casual do you want to be?
    From here on in...
    From now on...
    Better still, dispense with the whole darn thing, and say ' The rules of The Society of Foreros (TSoF) are as follows....' and thereafter use just TSoF. Everybody will know what is meant, after all.
     
  8. MissFit

    MissFit Senior Member

    I agree with Sloopjc and JamesM; I would use hereinafter. These legal-ese terms may seem pretentious, but they exist for a reason. They have a very precise and specialized meaning that prevents ambiguity. If you want more widely understood language, you will need a long phrase, from this point forward in this document.
     
  9. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    "Hereinafter" is a very useful word, but if you don't want to use it (and I can understand why), just use brackets:

    The Gorgeous Pink Dresses Club of Nottingham (GPDCN)...

    And then just use "GPDCN" in the rest of the document.
     
  10. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    Good idea Winklepicker and Emma42.

    I only see "hereafter referred to" or "hereafter, GPDCN" -- never "hereinafter."
     
  11. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Ooh, sorry, winklepicker. I didn't notice you had suggested exactly the same thing. Abject apologies.

    You're welcome, river. As has been pointed out, there is a significant difference between "hereafter" and "hereinafter".
     
  12. sloopjc Senior Member

    UK English
    The point here, is that the name needs to be referred to throughout the document. As a set of rules, you cannot rely on quoting once, "The Gorgeous Pink Dresses Club of Nottingham (GPDCN)" at the start of the document, and then just refer to it by its abbreviation throughout the rest of the document. There should be no guesswork involved, whether it is blindingly obvious to you or not.
     
  13. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Of course you can just quote it once. One has to assume a modicum of intelligence.
     
  14. sloopjc Senior Member

    UK English
    Rules leave nothing to chance.
     
  15. la reine victoria Senior Member

    I think it all depends on the type of club as to whether or not one uses the word "hereinafter". If it is a formal club, such as a village cricket or football club, then one would expect to use it.

    I can't see it being used in the rules of our local petanque club, where matches are played between pubs. The same goes for darts or snooker clubs.

    We shall have to wait to hear back from Abilona.

    LRV
     
  16. la reine victoria Senior Member


    Making assumptions can be fraught with danger.

    LRV
     
  17. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    Depends on your dictionary:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hereafter

    The United States Department of the Treasury, hereafter referred to as "Treasury" or "the Government" awarded Northrop Grumman the Treasury Communications Contract in 1995. . .

    There are many examples of this usage.
     
  18. Giordano Bruno

    Giordano Bruno Senior Member

    English, England
    "Hereafter" always makes me think of the world beyond the grave.
     

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