het talige voorbij, wordt neer-

Discussion in 'Nederlands (Dutch)' started by muktuck, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. muktuck New Member

    English-U.S.
    Can someone tell me how they would translate these lines into English?:

    instorten en het open veld,
    het talige voorbij, wordt neer-


    Not sure what "talige" means here. It is from a poem by Hans Faverey. thank you!
     
  2. bibibiben

    bibibiben Senior Member

    Amsterdam
    Dutch - Netherlands
    Het talige voorbij = Beyond that which can be expressed in words/language.

    There must surely be a more concise translation. I hope others can come up with one.
     
  3. muktuck New Member

    English-U.S.
    great, thanks!
    and the hyphen after "neer-" -- does this make the verb into a kind of prefix? "fall-" ...?
     
  4. bibibiben

    bibibiben Senior Member

    Amsterdam
    Dutch - Netherlands
    Sorry, I didn't notice you wanted a full translation.
     
    Your quote is part of a long and winding sentence:
     
    Zelfs nu nog,
    kun je zodra je het wilt,
    kun je zo met je haren schudden,
    dat de muren van het benoembare
    instorten en het open veld,
    het talige voorbij, wordt neer-
    gesabeld, tot er niets meer
    van over is waarover je droomde.

    As you can see, 'neer-' is part of 'gesabeld'. It may be unusual to split up 'neersabelen' here, but, well, stranger things happen in poems.

    'Neersabelen' literally means 'to put to the sword', but I'd say that 'to cut down' would be more suitable in this case.

    A rough translation would be:

    "Even now, you can, as soon as you want, shake your hair in such a way that the walls of the nameable collapse and the open field, beyond that which can be expressed in words, is cut down until nothing remains of what you were dreaming."

    It's no doubt far from being a perfect translation but I suppose it'll help you understand this part of the poem a bit more.
     
  5. muktuck New Member

    English-U.S.
    ahhh, interesting -- i've never read Faverey's poems across the page, always assumed each was it's own poem as in Dickinson -- but this makes much more sense now -- thanks!
     

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