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  1. cleo_starlight New Member

    france
    france
    HI,

    Comment peut-on traduire en anglais cette expression:
    c'est à 3 ou 4 heures de route de chez nous

    merci
     
  2. chain-reaction Senior Member

    South of France
    France, french
    "It is 3 to 4 four hours drive from here"
     
  3. Sitaa Senior Member

    India
    France French
    Hi,

    I would say "it's 3 or 4 hours drive from our place" but there may be a mistake somewhere
     
  4. chain-reaction Senior Member

    South of France
    France, french
    "It is 3 to 4 hours drive from ours" est plus proche de la phrase originale, désolé.
     
  5. Crème Brulée Senior Member

    Paris
    Ireland (English)
    Yes, but I'd say "It's a three to four hour drive from our house."
     
  6. chain-reaction Senior Member

    South of France
    France, french
    Ok, crème brulée is right.
     
  7. cleo_starlight New Member

    france
    france
    Thank you so much
    Merci beaucoup
     
  8. Jean-Michel Carrère Senior Member

    French from France
    You can actually say both :
    It is 3 to 4 hour-drive to ...
    It is a 3 to 4 hours' drive to ... our place.
     
  9. floise Senior Member

    Quebec
    U.S.;English
    I agree with J-M Carrère's second translation (but would not use the first, without the 'a' ):

    'It's a 3- to 4-hours' drive to our house'.

    or

    It's a 3- to 4-hour-drive to our house.

    But I'm not sure about those hyphens. I'm using them because the number plus 'hour' plus 'drive' are taken together as one word. It seems they should be there for that reason, but I'd need to hear from a punctuation specialist. Any out there?


    Floise
     
  10. Crème Brulée Senior Member

    Paris
    Ireland (English)
    You don't need the hyphens there because hyphens, in this sort of phrase would be used to replace "to"
    3-4 hour drive
     
  11. Jean-Michel Carrère Senior Member

    French from France
    I agree. End-of-week exhaustion, I am afraid !
     
  12. gerardovox

    gerardovox Senior Member

    I have to disagree with floise (#9)

    The hour in these sentences is not acting as a counter but as part of an adjectival phrase

    Compare:
    She is twenty years old. (Years is a countable noun)

    and
    The twenty year-old woman (year part of the adjectival phrase)



    I would go with Crème Brulées suggestion #5
     
  13. floise Senior Member

    Quebec
    U.S.;English
    Crème Brûlée,

    I was not using the hyphen as a substitute for 'to'. I had the 'to' there already.

    Gerardovox:

    I have support for my use of 'a 3- to 4-hour drive'. The use of the hyphen is to weld together two words modifying a noun. Here are grammar sites that explain the use of the hyphen in such a case:

    The Translators' Workplace: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/397989 :
    QUESTION:
    Which is correct, three-hour per week course or three-hour-per-week course?
    According to my grammar book there should be a hyphen after each word because they're all functioning as one adjective, but checking on the Internet, I found only a hyphen between three and hour or no hyphen at all.

    ANSWER:
    Your grammar book is correct. The Internet is not.

    a three-hour-per-week course

    a three-hour lecture

    and so on.

    *****************************************************

    ALSO, FROM http://www.uwf.edu/writelab/reviews/cap.cfm

    HYPHENATE
    • Words with a fixed hyphen (use a dictionary)
    • Compound modifiers preceding a noun: a three-hour movie
    • Words beginning with the prefixes self-, all-, and well-
    • Prefixes before a proper noun: all-American
    • fractions used as modifiers: one-third voter turnout
    • numbers from twenty-one to ninety-nine
    • multiword adjectives: out-of-state checks
    • some compound nouns: mother-in-law
    *****************************************************

    Thanks for taking the time to look at this.

    Floise
     
  14. Crème Brulée Senior Member

    Paris
    Ireland (English)
    Yes, thank you for that.
    I do understand. I use hyphens al the time for the words you listed.

    May I point out that it doesn't say anywhere that you can say "3- to 4-hour...." whatever it may be. Nowhere in the list of words you supplied does it use two numbers together to describe an approximate time period.

    Why? Because the "to" in this sentence implies the hyphen as I said before.
    Above all, it looks quite strange to me.
     
  15. Crème Brulée Senior Member

    Paris
    Ireland (English)
    P.S I know you were not using the the hyphen as a substitute for "to". The problem that I have with the sentence is that "to" means "-" and both can't be present in this phrase.
     
  16. floise Senior Member

    Quebec
    U.S.;English
    Crème Brûlée,

    Thanks for reading my long, but colorful explanation.

    I found a few examples of the use of 'dangling' hyphens. Yes, they do look strange, but I believe they are correct.

    [SIZE=-1]The beads were brushed on all samples except the 2- by 3-inch. and the 4- by 5-inch

    [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]Over the next several weeks, build up gradually to a 20- to- 30-minute... Hold stretch for 15-20 seconds, then repeat with other leg. walk, ...
    www.apta.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Search&template=/

    Floise
    [/SIZE]
     
  17. gerardovox

    gerardovox Senior Member

    Floise, my dear,
    1. I can totally see your point about the hyphens :tick::):thumbsup: (but I never really wanted to make an opinion on the subject and nor am I making an opinion now, and which is why I suggested that post #5 was the best option to avoid the issue.)

    2. However my one and only point from the start was simply that the "s" you added in the post above (#9) was grammatically incorrect :thumbsdown::)
    Basically the rule to remember is that if you are using hyphens to make an adjectival phrase then you cannot pluralise. You obviously agree with me on this point because all of your posts since have dropped the "s"

    3. Just trying to help really, feel free to correct any mistake in my grammar!
     

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