Hindi: डीम्ड

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Thomas Keyes, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. Thomas Keyes Senior Member

    Southeast Asia
    USA, English
    डीम्ड

    This could be the English word deemed. It has to do with some universities being downgraded. What is the precise meaning?
     
  2. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English
    "deemed" = considered, judged to be ...

    He was deemed insane by the court.
     
  3. Not.A.Linguist Junior Member

    New York
    Hindi
    Just to clarify on the news, those deemed universities are not being "downgraded", they are not being "upgraded" to university status.
     
  4. Thomas Keyes Senior Member

    Southeast Asia
    USA, English
    Thank you. I know what deemed means, but deemed requires a complement. In the example you cited, insane is the complement. But in the Hindi newspapers, they kept referring to deemed universities, without any complement added to deemed. They may mean accredited, I'm not sure. Naturally, when they adopt English words, they adopt British rather than American usage. Deemed may mean accredited in England, for all I know.

    Then there's the possibility that this is not the English word deemed at all.
     
  5. Not.A.Linguist Junior Member

    New York
    Hindi
    You are correct at figuring out the usage. Also is correct that Indian languages have borrowed words from English which are used loosely. British usage are more common because of the colonial rule.
     
  6. Thomas Keyes Senior Member

    Southeast Asia
    USA, English
    Ok, thank you.
     
  7. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
    Further to the inputs by Not. A. Linguist, I will like to add that at times and often even if an equivalent Hindi word exists the media prefers to use the English word which is in common use and thus better understood than an unheard of quaint Hindi equivalent.


    "Deemed university is a status of autonomy granted to high performing institutes and departments of various universities in India. This status of ‘Deemed-to-be-University’, is granted by Deptt. Of Higher Education, Union Human Resource Development Ministry, on the advice of the University Grants Commission (UGC) of India, under Section 3 of the University Grants Commission (UGC) Act, 1956 [1][2].
    The UGC began in 1956 after Indian parliament passed the University Grants Commission Act "to make provision for the co-ordination and determination of standards in Universities and for that purpose, to establish a University Grants Commission."
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deemed_university
     
  8. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English

    Next time you ask what a word means in some particular context, at least give the full Hindi setence if not more. 90% of meaning depends so much on context.
     
  9. Thomas Keyes Senior Member

    Southeast Asia
    USA, English
    It's all very clear now. Thank you. Next time, I'll include a more extensive quotation.

    Yes, I've noticed that, often, the newspapers will use an English word or phrase where there is a clear Hindi equivalent, as rol instead of bhumika. Then, of course, there are thousands of synonyms from Arabic and Persian too. Very perplexing.
     
  10. omlick Senior Member

    Portland, Oregon, USA
    American English
    In colloquial Hindi, especially among the less educated, English words are abundant, and the ones using it don't even realize they are even English words as they are now so part of the language. Many of the Hindi equivalents would not even be understood among the less educated masses and are considered "dictionary words."
     
  11. Thomas Keyes Senior Member

    Southeast Asia
    USA, English
    There's not much opportunity for me to speak Hindi, as so many speak English. So my learning has been limited to reading newspapers for the nost part.
     

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