Hindi: karat karat abhyaas ke, jadmat hoth Sujaan...

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by albondiga, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    karat karat abhyaas ke, jadmat hoth Sujaan
    rasri aavat jaat hai, sir par hot nisaan

    Hi all,

    I am guessing that the above is (a) a very shuddh Hindi phrase (b) in a very unfamiliar romanization... just my guess (for all I know it might be another language altogether :)), but in any case I can make little sense of it. Can anyone:

    (a) help me decipher, and
    (b) show me what it would look like in Devanagari?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    [size=+2]करत करत अभ्यास के, जड़मति होत सुजान
    रसरी आवत जात ते, सिल पर परत निसान[/size]

    It is a Doha. From Wiki:
    It is not surprising that you did not understand it, since it is not modern Hindi.

    The meaning:

    karat karat abhyaas ke: abhyaas (practice) kar kar ke = on doing lots of practice.
    jadmati hot sujaan : mati refers to buddhi = intelligence. So it means that even a thick-brained fool can become intelligent.

    The second part of the doha is:
    rasari aawat jaat te, sil par parat nisaan : rasari = rassi = rope. sil = stone. aawat jaat te = aane jaane se. parat nisaan = nishaan pad jaata hai.

    So, the whole thing together means:

    Persistence makes even a dumb man intelligent, just like (even) a soft rope, when rubbed continuously on stone, makes a mark on it.
     
  3. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
    Dear albondiga
    It's in old Hindi and most probably written by Tulsidas who wrote Ram Charit Manas or Ramayna in verse.

    Literally it means "Practice makes a man perfect" and let me try to translate it word for word.
    Kart kart means "karte Karte or doing repeatedly.
    Abhyas means practice.
    Jadmati means someone whose "mati", intellect is like stone(Jad means lifeless).
    Hot Sujan means "hota hai" or "Ho jata hai" or becomes "Sujan" means knowledgeable- "Su" means good, "jan" means Jan_na" or Gyan i.e. knowledge.
    "Rasri" means "Rassi" or rope.
    "Aavt- jat" se means "Aane- Jane se" means the reciprocating motion of the rope (to which a bucket is suspended for drawing water from the well).
    "Sil par hot nishaan" the rim of the well gets impressioned.
    What the poet wants to say is that Like repeated up and down motion of a soft rope over the stone wear it same way by repeated practice even a fool can become a man of knowlwdge.
     
  4. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    Wow... thanks, Illuminatus & bakshink!
     
  5. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Where did you find this? Folk Hindi is really difficult for me; if you think Khadi Boli is tough with all its postpositions, wait till you start reading Awadhi or Braj. Those languages take lots of time, skill, and patience(!).
     
  6. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    I can vouch for this PG! As a young lad I heard a lot of Awadhi in places like Sitapur, Paintipur etc. near Luckhnow but even so some words give me trouble. The lack of availability of glossaries and dictionaries is really a problem - and a pity.
    I was introduced to the <dohas> of Kabir, Tulsidas and Abdur Rahim Khan by various family members. I did manage to float. Later my uncle threw Rahim Khan’s Sanskrit verses at me. Apparently Abur Rahim Khan did compose a little in Sanskrit too. That is when I quit.
     
  7. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    These Dohas are stuff kids are taught in school. You have those chapters in Hindi textbooks with Kabeerdaas ke dohe, raheemdaas ke dohe etc.
     
  8. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
    Dear Panjabigator
    Ironically the thread is "Karat karat abhyas se, jadmati hot sujaan".:)
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2009
  9. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Haha, very true. Looks like I better practice!
     
  10. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    I went to the wrong school(s)!
     
  11. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
    Dear Faylasoof
    Right and wrong is a matter of perspective. Driving on the left side of the road is right in India but is wrong in America. There's a lot right in wrong.
     
  12. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    It was included at the bottom of someone's post in another forum (not a language-related forum), in a discussion about practicing Hindi (incidentally, the post was in direct response to some other posts regarding the use of the word "abhyaas" vs. "practice"... :) )
     
  13. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    I am scared of posting anything witty/humorous in the forum nowadays, lest I be chastised by bakshiji!
     
  14. cpn New Member

    malayalam - Indian

    The line " rasari aawat jaat hai, sil par parat nisaan" - refers to a line of ants which traverse a set path day in day out, resulting in a ropelike impression on stone, to stress that practice makes perfect.
     

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