Hindi: Lalbhai, Harilal, etc.

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Todd The Bod, May 30, 2012.

  1. Todd The Bod Senior Member

    Ngo hai ni doh
    English-Midwest
    I see a lot of names that have the word "lal" in them. I don't rememeber if this is exclusively Gujarati names or not, but my question is in these names does the word mean "red"? Does the color "red" have a special spiritual significance in the Hindu religion, or does the component "lal" in the names mean something different altogether?
     
  2. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    This thread may interest you: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2370731
     
  3. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Based on this, Harilal would mean - Son of Hari.
     
  4. Todd The Bod Senior Member

    Ngo hai ni doh
    English-Midwest
    Thanks, Tonio Bhai!
     
  5. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    Harilal rather means "the beloved of Hari": the word "lal" is often used for sons. That does not mean that "lal" need mean "son" only.
     
  6. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Shukriya bhai. I was going off of what a website said, but your explanation does make more sense.
     
  7. Todd The Bod Senior Member

    Ngo hai ni doh
    English-Midwest
    So Lalbhai would mean then "beloved brother" then, hunh? Deep. Thanks Greatbear!
     
  8. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Is harii the same as har, which is another name for God (and should go here if you confirmed it were)?
     
  9. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    Hari does indeed mean Har, one of the names for God in the Hindu pantheon. However, it should not go to the thread you cite since Todd had asked only for Urdu names for God, whereas Hari/Har are exclusively Hindi words.
     
  10. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    "Bhaai" is a suffix added to names without really meaning "brother": in Gujarat, for example, women even refer to their husbands using their names + "bhai" construct, which indeed does add to the oddity when one thinks about the literal meaning of "bhaai" (or "bhai", as in Gujarati).
     
  11. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    BP SaaHib, here are examples of both "Har" and "Hari" used by Urdu poets.

    kyaa masjid meN kyaa mandir meN sab jalvah hai vajhu_llaah kaa
    parbat meN, nagar meN, saagar meN, Har utraa hai har-jaa jogii

    Khushi Muhammad Naazir (Please see post 45 of the link below). I would recommend this poem to all those who know Urdu and Hindi. Post 21 has a partial glossary.

    https://groups.google.com/group/alt.../thread/65e59dad5f0e67d3?tvc=1&q=har+har+jogi

    Here is Iqbal..

    gilah-i-jafaa-i-vafaa numaa, kih Haram ko ahl-i-Haram se hai
    kisii butkade meN bayaaN karuuN, to kahe sanam bhii, “Harii Harii"
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
  12. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Tod The Bod SaaHib "laal" does mean "red"* as well as multiple other meanings, as provided by Platts. This topic was also discussed in another thread.

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2245901&highlight=laal

    Here is Platt's entry.

    H لال लालlāl [Pers. also lāl; prob. S. लाल, fr. caus. of rt. लल्; cf. lāṛ and lāṛlā], adj. Beloved, darling, dear, precious;—dumb;—s.m. An infant boy, a son; a darling, a pet;—a proper name (among Hindūs):—lāl-bujhakkar, s.m. An ignorant (or a stupid) fellow who pretends to knowledge or acuteness, an ignoramus, a jackanapes, wiseacre:—lāl-beg, or lāl-gurū, s.m. The priest of the sweeper caste:—lāl-begiyā, s.m. A follower of Lāl-Beg:—lāloṅ-kā lāl, adj. & s.m. Most dear; very dear;—the dearest of dear ones.

    *
    meraa juutaa hai jaapaanii, yih patluun inglistaanii
    sar pih laal Topii ruusii phir bhii dil hai hindustaanii
     
  13. jakubisek Junior Member

    Czechia
    Czech
    Is there any etymological relation between the laal "dear" and laal "red"?

    In Russian there's relation between "red" and "beautiful" (And it's a false friend in Czech: The Russian "red one" means in CZ "pretty one"). Could there be some similar "logic" behind? (Well, as for the Slavic area, I guess the connection lies in red cheeks being considered beautiful)
     
  14. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    ^ I think the relation might be once again "red cheeks", which are considered beautiful in India as well (even if very few have 'em).
     
  15. Wolverine9 Senior Member

    American English
    No, there is no connection. They are homonyms, but laal "dear" is Indic while laal "red" is Persian (or, perhaps, Arabic).

    Also, reference this thread here.
     

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