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Hindi/Urdu: Biharis

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by lcfatima, Jun 13, 2009.

  1. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    What characterizes a person as having Bihari accent in Hindi or Urdu?
     
  2. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    The ones I've heard have a sing-song character to their speech!
     
  3. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Well, its somewhat of a k-haRaa dialect, the vowel sounds are crisp and rather to the extremes of what they could be. For example, me.n ('in') becomes maa.n, and kaesaa gets even more markedly dipthongised to kaaiisaa.

    I feel its spoken from a bit forward in the buccal cavity than Lak-hnawii Urdu, which is rather low, glottal and very non-nasal. But they too say ham for mai.n like us!

    Very interstingly too, gender reversal w.r.t standard Urdu sometimes occurs e.g. ii gaaRii kahaa.n pa aaye gaa instead of ye gaaRii kahaa.n pe/par aaye gii.

    Truth be told, you can't speak Behaarii unless you have a paan kaa beeRaa in your mouth!

    PS: Fat, I'll send you a link to Behaarii-speak by PM. Unfortunately forum rules don't allow videos embedded in posts.
     
  4. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Jack did you mean 'hum batlay rahen hain'?

    That's the coolest thing I've heard all morning!
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2009
  5. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Okay thanks.
     
  6. bakshink Senior Member

    China
    punjabi
    Go to any Hindi News Channel and listen to video clips of Laaloo Parsad Yadav speaking or hear Nitish Kumar ( the present Chief Minister of Bihar) or Ram Vilas Paswan speak. In many Hindi movies Shool, Hazaron Khwaheshein Aisi and many others, the accent is beautifully captured.
     
  7. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Laalooji is highly entertaining! And very endearing too!

    I guess in my earlier reply I was too brief. I in fact recognise the main features of this dialect well. But it really does depend on the level of education of your Bihari speaker. There is the <rustic> accent, like that of the ever-likable Laalooji and there are those who you could mistake for even a Lakhnavi! The latter includes a branch of my family that seems to have retained the accent and speech of their Urduphone forefathers from UP.
     
  8. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Even though the accents are vastly different, the whole area was/is? for some reason logically bunched together, I've heard our elders refer to UP-Behaar ever so often together.
     
  9. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو

    In another thread (Urdu-Hindi: lena, karna etc. maculine forms) there has been a lot of talk about "Bihari". If you type "( Loose Talk) Behari Part1 on Youtube, you will find a very interesting comical piece. If you do find it entertaining, you can move onto part 2! There are also videos on the Hyderabadi, Delhi, Lakhnavi and othe accents. Cricket lovers will also find this series of some interest.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  10. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    ^Thank you, the Bihari accent is spot on in that series. But from what I could find, the Lakhnawi meme is missing. The Dilli one I found atrocious since it represented only the Baazaarii register, not the Teksaalii high Urdu of Dillii that is such a relish to the ears in my experience.
     
  11. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Why is it that Biharis mix up gender in Urdu? Doesn't Bihari and the Hindi-Urdu related dialects used in Bihar have gender?
     
  12. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    The similarity of this comedic piece and this forum at times had me laughing hysterically.


    I think it was meant that for them certain objects have a different gender. The same occurs between Hindi and some forms of Urdu with certain words also.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  13. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Tonyspeed: The thing is, that doesn't seem to be the case in Bihari accent. I realize that different dialects of Hindi/Urdu also assign different gender to certain nouns (we have discussed dahi before) but with Biharis it seems as if, like Bengalis when they speak Hindi, they mix up gender a lot...Bengali doesn't have gender so there is the explanation, but what is the explanation for Biharis? Can it really be that gaRi is masculine in various dialects spoken in Bihari?

    An example: several years ago I was speaking with my IL's head housekeeper. She is born and raised in Bihar and came to Karachi around 12 years ago (as an adult, she is in her late 40s). She is educated and not from a rural background, though I don't know if any specific dialect other than Urdu is spoken by her people at home (she says she is from Patna, she did not spend time in Bangladesh like many other Biharis in Karachi, but she may have roots in another part of Bihar and just say she comes from Patna to keep things simple). Her accent sounds fairly standard to me, except she says things like "sabzi accha hai." I noticed this and I thought perhaps she was imitating my manner of speaking back to me, since I do not always use the correct gender on nouns when I speak in Urdu, and as a non-native I have occasionally had people do this to me in other languages (more often in Arabic for some reason) and I asked my mother in law about it. She said, oh no, Bua is not making fun of you, this is how Biharis talk. I listened to her some more and I found that she seemed to say everything as if it were masculine...like BP's example about gaRi.
     
  14. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    This is just a speculation, but Bihari and Bengali do cross paths. Where does Bihari end and Bengali begin? I was watching a video once with rural people in the Bihar region or round about there and
    the person used a word for animal I had never heard. Upon researching it, I realised that the word was used in Bengali. So depending on where she is from, I can see how the influence of Bengali
    could be evident in her speech pattern. I believe this is the theory why Nepali (and Bengali) also virtually has no gender as well - it's usually what happens when a non-gender and a gender language mix.

    Of course this is pure speculation.
     
  15. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    So, if Icfatima is speculating and you are also speculating, have we got any further with the enquiry?
     
  16. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Indeed, we have not.

    In that case, please see this book: Gender across Languages by Bussmann. It explains the reason clearly. In certain areas use of standard gender agreement is seen as "over-educated" or "foreign", particularly among "uneducated female speakers". Javaab milaa!
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  17. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Also google a pdf called "A COMPARATIVE PHONOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE DIALECTS OF HINDI" Diwakar Mishraa & Kalika Bali. It has a nice description of the phonological differences of Bhojpuri.
     
  18. ainch New Member

    Nepali
    To anyone still interested, Nepali does have gender but is reserved for living beings.

    e.g.,
    Sita walks = Sita hi(n)Dchhe (सीता हिँड्छे) - feminine
    Ram walks = Ram hi(n)Dchha (राम हिँड्छ) - masculine

    for vehicles, wind etc, it's always masculine
    the wind blows = haawaa chalchha (हावा चल्छ) - masculine
    the car goes forward = gaaDi agaaDi jaanchha (गाडी अगाडी जान्छ) - masculine
     

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