Hindi, Urdu: choor and bhoor

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by lcfatima, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Aamchoor is a fine powder, but moTichoor laddu has a beady texture. And then there are some Indian dishes labeled bhurji or something. Paneer ki bhurji or anDay ki bhurji. How is something bhoor-ed different than something choor-ed? Are there verbs connected to these terms?
     
  2. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Wiki says anDay ka khaagiina is the Urdu term for anDay ki bhurji.
     
  3. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    We always use the term <anDay ka khaagiina >.

    Words related to <choor> are <choorā = powder/ crumbs> and <chooran = digestive powder,often with a light aroma>
     
  4. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Love chooran! So tasty :)

    We say <bhujī> in my house. Is <khāgīnā> spelled with a /x/?

    Careful not to say <chūrā>, as that is a pejorative term for an untouchable caste.
     
  5. Cilquiestsuens Senior Member

    French

    Yes <chūRā> (with a retroflex 'R') is I think a very common insult in Punjab (I don't think it is an Urdu word). It means something like crook, or gypsy, or kanjar ! Here in PK all the chooRe have become christians.

    Does this word have any connection with the word chuRail ????
     
  6. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Hmmm, no clue. Many <çūṛe> in India have converted as well but the slur still lives in Panjabi. I've heard <çuṛā kahī.n kā> many, many times. Now imagine my shock when I go to India the first time after years and discover that many of the insults (<bha.ngī>, for example) I learned were also low castes!

    Crazy.

    No clue about any connection with <chuṛel>.
     
  7. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    <khāgīnā> is indeed with a <x> -> <xāgīnā> - so no aspirated <k>!

    Never knew about this use of <chūrā>! ... and never used it by mistake either!!
     
  8. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    What about bhoor? Also, there are no verbs for these? So can I pair them with hona/karna?
     
  9. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I am unfamiliar with <bhūr>, but I believe <būr> is a word used with ripening mangos, at least in Panjabi. Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
     
  10. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    gator, I've heard a similar word. It sounds like 'boar' in English and is used for mango flowers. Unripe mangos are called a.mbia (meem ghunna there!) and kairi.

    The bhoor Icf is referring to is totally novel for me. choor isn't of course. It's granules (powder too?), something more coarse than a sufoof - سفوف. Maybe your word has a connection with bhurbhura - بھربھرا.
     
  11. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, an unripe mango for us too is a kairi - good for making chutney and achār and stored in a <martabān> to mature.
    [مرتبان martabān, (masc.) A glazed, earthenware jar for keeping preserves and pickles.]


    Never heard of bhoor.
     
  12. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    What if bhoor is only with a pesh, no wow?
     
  13. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    It still doesn't ring a bell. Words that comes close are:
    <bhurbhurā> = crisp/sandy
    AND
    <bhurbhurānā> = to sprinkle a powdery substance (sugar / salt etc.)
     
  14. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I consulted Oxfords dictionary and it confirms Faylasoof's post.

    <būr> doesn't seem to be it either.

    Do you mean भुर? If so, I'm not seeing anything in Oxford's Hindi dictionary.

    What was the context of this word?
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2009
  15. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    paneer ki bhurji, anday ki bhurji
     
  16. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    Faylasoof: is there a way to say preserves/jam that is related to that word for vessel?
     
  17. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Ok, right. I do remember reading that earlier.

    Well I can't find <bhujī> (what we say in my house) or <bhurjī> in the dictionary...
     
  18. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, there is. We call all kinds of jams, compotes and preserves (including marmalades) as <murabbah (masc.) مربہ >.

    In olden times they were prepared, stored / preserved in a <martabān>. Now we have them ready-made.

    Also, many people are using English words for these as you can see here. In fact, this site specifically uses مربہ for a compote. But given that all these (jams, compotes etc.) are essentially the made the same basic way , we use the term murabbah for all these preparations. However, even us <Urdudān> have to use the English equivalents now in the shops as some people think a مربہ is something only <hakīms> prepare and has medicinal properties!
     
  19. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    The medicinal concoction is KaDha. Eg. Tulsi ka KaDha. Vile as hell, supposedly effective...

    Something similar to une tisane
     
  20. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    I made murabba-e-saib just a few days ago! In my case it was cooked so long that it became more of a confiture than a compote.

    Illum, this kaDha, is it extracts (Urdu: 'arqiyaat) of say tulsi or dried/processed leaves/other plant parts? At least it's one of the two that I get when i ask for une tisane. A compote would be different - fruit cooked in sheera or caramel for dessert.
     
  21. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    Yeah, extracts of medicinal leaves boiled with other stuff. Used as medication. Tisane is more like Herbal Tea, I think. KhaDha has a reputation for generally being vile/pungent (enough to drive diseases away ;) )though it can be made tolerable.

    Une confiture = Jam, je croix.
     
  22. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    You're right about jam == confiture. murabba could be less coarse and more homogeous if you make it so, hence my calling it confiture in that instance.
     
  23. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    I guess jauhar joshanda counts as a murabba in this sense even though it is made of jaRi booTi?

    I have seen murabba for preserves of fruit often (perhaps on labels), I just couldn't think of the exact word when I saw martabaan.
     
  24. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Jauhar joshaanda is a tisane. You don't see lumps of fruits in it floating around in gooey, slurpy goodness do you!
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2009
  25. lcfatima Senior Member

    In a teapot
    English USA
    firainch nahi.n seekh raha hai koi yahaan par, please apni guftagoo urdu/hindi tak mahdood rakhiega zara
     
  26. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
  27. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    As already pointed out, the "r" in this word is a retroflex (R). The word is attested in Urdu. It means "a sweeper". (And I believe in Punjabi, there is a tone involved).
     
  28. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    You're right about the retroflex. Is it a falling tone on the first syllable? Haven't heard it in a while.
     
  29. littlepond Senior Member

    Hindi
    I don't know if ripening-of-mangoes sense for "buur" is there or not in Hindi, but otherwise "buur" (or "buuR") can be a very vulgar word in Hindi (denoting a part of female anatomy).
     

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