Hindi/Urdu - conjugation of imperatives

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by tonyspeed, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Normally, we think of imperatives having an invisible subject, and the imperative forms agree with that subject.

    (aap) kiijie naa!
    (tum) karo naa!
    (tu) kar naa!

    But what about a more complex sentence like one from the song "HasrateN Baar Baar Yaad kii Karo".

    Is 'kii' here agreeing with the invisible subject (tum) who is a female or is is agreeing with hasrat which is feminine?

    If this sentence is spoken to a male, would it change to (aap) hasrateN baar baar yaad kiyaa karo?
     
  2. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    [Urdu]

    A word of explanation about this sample complex sentence:

    The verse from this Urdu song is حسرتیں بار بار بار بار یار کی کرو which transliterates into HasrateN baar baar baar baar yaar kii karo.

    I know the difference between ‘daal’ د and ‘re’ ر might be not so great for an untrained eye, but it changes the whole sentence. In this way, there remains no question of ‘yaad kiyaa karo vs. yaad kii karo’, while the latter would be not admissible as contrary to the grammar.

    What remains, is ‘HasrateN karo’, ‘xwaahisheN karo(kis kii?): yaar kii.
    I hope this helps you out further.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  3. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Further to above, "kaun kare?". "tum karo". There is no invisible subject as such.

    tuu kar/tum karo/aap kareN/aap kiiji'e/aap kiiji'e gaa
     
  4. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole

    Interesting maarish ji. It seems like I inserted my own consonant based on what I expected to hear.
    How would you therefore translate this sentence into English? (grieve for your friend?)
     
  5. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    I'll leave the answer to QP SaaHib:).
     
  6. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    It seems you read faster than I can fix.

    But just for clarification it would never be grammatical to say "hasrateN kii karo", only "hasrateN kiyaa karo".
     
  7. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    :D:D:D
    Yes. It would not be ever grammatical to say ''(yaar kii) HasrateN kii karo'', instead of ''(yaar kii) HasrateN karo'' or ''(yaar kii) HasrateN kiyaa karo''.
     
  8. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Why are you adding "naa" at the end?
     
  9. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Idleness I guess. No particular reason.
     

Share This Page