Hindi/Urdu/Marathi/Panjabi: sleep (n.)

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by panjabigator, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    What is the the Hindi, Urdu, and Marathi equivalent for "sleep?"

    As defined by the New Oxford American Dictionary:
    The word that we use for this in my house is गिड्डा (<giDDaa>; might even be nasal) but I'm uncertain if this is an "actual" Hindi word. I suspect it's Panjabi.
     
  2. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    In Urdu-Hindi 'sleep' is <neend> and in Urdu-Farsi <xwaab> -pronounced <xaab>
     
  3. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Sorry Faylasoof, I didn't refer to that definition of sleep. I meant the "sleep" that is found in the eyes upon waking up in the morning.

    Refer to the definition I've cited in my introductory post.
     
  4. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Ah! I've heard <cheepaR> as well as ...and wait for it...<keechaR>! The latterasyou know is also used for mud,slime and mire! In Luckhnow, and esp.our home, we used <keechaR>!!!
     
  5. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Interesting. Panjabi flips it to <chikkaR>. I think I remember reading in some Joseph Cardona text that Marathi uses the same word, but we'll await Illuminatus.
     
  6. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    My mother often used to call it <chipaR> but I didn't know whether it was a Marathi word or some baby speak. Now I realize it was definitely not baby speak.

    I will confirm and get back to you.
     
  7. BP. Senior Member

    Karachi
    Urdu
    Or simply aa.nkh ka mayl!
     
  8. Illuminatus Senior Member

    Mumbai, India
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    Awww. Aan.kh ka mail sort of reduces its image...

    :)
     
  9. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    SaaHibaan-e-vaalaa,

    I don't have a lot of time at the moment - attending a meeting. Just another occupational hazards!! But before I departed home this morning I had a look at three dictionaries and all of them confirmed our Luckhnavi idiosyncrasy of calling mud and mire with the same name as what you are left after a looong snooze, viz. <keechaR>.

    ... and BP there is something about this word that wouldn't quite conjure up the right image, as Illumin says. However, your statement has reminded me of something very interesting that I heard recently on one of these Pakistani channels. It went something like this:
    <<waziir-e-a3zam SaaHab ne kahaa keh Pakistan ek zimmehdaar mulk hai jo har
    mauqe3 ke liye Tayyar hai aur usko koi bhi maylii aan.kh se nahii.n dekh saktaa! >>

    I nearly fell off my sofa! So now we’ll hear a lot of <maylii aan.kh se dekhnaa> - obviously a literal translation of <to give someone a dirty look>. Sigh! Sigh!


    PS: I guess <maylii aan.kh se dekhnaa> sounds a lot better than <keechaR bharii aan.kh se dekhnaa>

     
  10. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Yes but not nearly as vivid.
     
  11. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    The word that we use is the same as you but with a final nasal "giddaaN"....singular "gidd" (feminine).
     
  12. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    For me it has been aaNkh kaa mail.
     
  13. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Same word. Misspelling. Thanks!
     
  14. marrish

    marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    It appears that this expression has found its way to at least this online lexicon:
    میلی آنکھ (کنایۃً) برے ارادے سے دیکھنے والی آنکھ، بری نظر، چشم بد۔
    [mailii aaNkh: (kinaayat-an) bure iraade se dekhne waalii aaNkh, burii nazar, chashm-e-bad.]
     
  15. littlepond Senior Member

    Hindi
    Hindi: According to Platts, "pinjat", which I've never used personally. We say "dheerh" in Hindi ("rh" as in "terhi" - oblique).
     
  16. Dib Senior Member

    Germany
    Bengali (India)
    Hey, this is similar to the corresponding Bengali word - "pichuTi".
     
  17. littlepond Senior Member

    Hindi
    ^ Ah, that's interesting!
     

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