Hindi-Urdu: to express interest

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by lambdakneit, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. lambdakneit

    lambdakneit Junior Member

    Midwest
    English - U.S.A., Español - México
    While talking to a Hindi speaking collegue of mine, I asked him how you say "to express interest in" or "to have interest in" in Hindi and he said

    kuch meN racii rakhnaa
    कुछ में रची रखना
    کچھ میں رچی رکھنا

    I have transliterated what I heard to the best of my abilities friends, but since I cannot find any of रचि, रची, राचि, or राची on the dictionary I concluded that it may come from the verb racnaa (रचना/رچنا).

    So the question is, is this a legitimate way of saying "to have interest in" or did I incorrectly hear what he said? Any suggestions or alternatives friends?
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  2. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Hi,

    It is possible that you´ve misheard him and it was रूचि ruchi (pron. ruchii)or his pronunciation was a bit different. Do check it up with him again.
    It is a Hindi word which is by the way not shared by Urdu, and it is completely legitimate in Hindi.

    Curious what other friends might say but I'd personally tend to say ''kisii baat/chiiz meN ruchi rakhnaa'', not ''kuchh meN''
     
  3. lambdakneit

    lambdakneit Junior Member

    Midwest
    English - U.S.A., Español - México
    I apologize marrish Jii, kuch meN rachii rakhnaa was my own construction. I misunderstood kuchh to mean chiiz. The original phrase was the following I believe:

    To tum hindu dharm meN ruchi rakhte ho.

    Of course with your suggestion of replacing racii with ruchi. And yes I see now, रुची may indeed be the word I was looking for. Many thanks Saa7ib.
     
  4. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    ^lambdakneit jii, there is no need to apologize, you are most welcome!
     
  5. lambdakneit

    lambdakneit Junior Member

    Midwest
    English - U.S.A., Español - México
    Many thanks marrish jii. I am also interested to know what the Urdu equivalent to this expression would be.
     
  6. Alfaaz Senior Member

    English
    For Urdu, perhaps the most common way to phrase this would be:

    to express interest in _______ - میں دل چسپی کا اظہار کرنا ________ - (______ meiN dil-chaspi kaa izhaar karnaa)
    to have interest in _______ - میں دل چسپی ہونا/رکھنا ________ - (______ meiN dil-chaspi honaa/rakhnaa)
    to take interest in _______ - میں دل چسپی لینا ________ - (______ meiN dil-chaspi lenaa)

    Note: other words could also be used for interest, such as رجحان .
     
  7. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Funnily enough, after years of Hindi study, I have never heard this word before, only dilchaspii. It might be pure Hindi, but it does not seem to be used colloquially.
     
  8. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    In cities you would mostly find people using "interest" in place of ruchii. If not "interest" native speakers of Hindi would tend to lean towards ruchii although I must admit they will have to make an effort to use it. I have not come across ruchii very often during casual conversations and the word used almost always is "interest" which of course is English.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  9. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Interesting. So who uses dilchaspii in Hindi?
     
  10. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    For both Hindi and Urdu, as tonyspeed SaaHib has indicated, one could say..

    maiN Hindi meN dil-chaspii rakhtaa huuN...or

    mujhe Hindi meN dil-chaspii hai,
     
  11. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    Both "ruchii" and "dilchaspii" are commonly used words in Hindi (as long as the speaker isn't saying "interest"). "Ruchii" is far more common in speech than "dilchaspii" - the former also carries the nuance of a more serious interest in something as opposed to mere "dilchaspii". This is merely from a Hindi point of view.
     
  12. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    How come I have!

    It does seem to be used, also colloquially:

    I agree with gb.
     
  13. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    Maybe it has to do with the sources. Do they ever say ruchi in movies or on TV?

    I have never heard it from these mediums. As a habit, I tend not to read shuddh Hindi which is where it seems
    to be most prevalent. Doing an internet search, both seem to be fairly commonly used, with ruchi slightly winning out
    in print mediums (but this could be because ruchi is also a name whereas dilchaspii is not).
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  14. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Is the word "ruchi" or "ruchii"? Platts has " (ki) ruchi karnaa" and not "ruchi rakhnaa". Is there "ruchi lenaa" as well?
     
  15. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    ^ Sorry, that's "ruchi", not "ruchii"! There is of course "ruchi lenaa" - very common. "ruchi rakhnaa" is also common; on the contrary, I've never heard "ruchi karnaa" in my life.

    @tonyspeed: "ruchi" is not at all "shuddh" Hindi. It's a word used a lot colloquially. If you are relying on TV soaps for your Hindi, then that's a pity, tonyspeed, for soaps' Hindi is very much skewed towards and against certain words (e.g., soaps/sensational news will use "daihashat", even though it's rarely used colloquially), and do not reflect actual spoken Hindi.
     
  16. lambdakneit

    lambdakneit Junior Member

    Midwest
    English - U.S.A., Español - México
    Many thanks friends for expanding my repetoire of Hindi and Urdu expressions. I did in fact confirm with my collegue that the word he used was ruchi.
     
  17. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Thanks for your feedback!
     
  18. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    To reiterate, I think you have missed this one:
     
  19. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Just to add, perhaps a simple ''دلچسپی دکھانا dil-chaspii dikhaanaa'' for ''to express interest'' or just ''to show interest'' can work as well.
     
  20. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Further to the last, for Hindi, dilchaspii dikhaanaa is also very good however, since the issue of High Hindi has been touched upon, I've also heard ruchi darshaanaa, which I find just lovely.
     
  21. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Is there such a verb as "darshanaa" too?
     
  22. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    I haven't looked it up in a dictionary but I certainly have heard it; I hope someone can confirm or deny. As there is aNgeznaa, why not darshaanaa?
     
  23. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ I presume you meant "darshanaa"? Is aNgeznaa "to get engaged" or "to engage"?
     
  24. lambdakneit

    lambdakneit Junior Member

    Midwest
    English - U.S.A., Español - México
    Confirmed. The verb दर्शाना/درشانا (not sure whether this is an Urdu word) is certainly in the dictionaries and it means to show or to indicate, marrish SaaHib.
     
  25. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you!!! Certainly not an Urdu word, take it from me.
     
  26. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    I began to doubt after your post, but the confirmation that I have a good ear and memory is there above.
    Re. aNgeznaa, none of them. Remember the Stirrer thread? fitnah-aNgez?

    H
    انگيزناअंगेज़नाangeznā (from angez), v.t. To stir up, excite; to bear, endure, suffer, experience.

    On a second thought, your hunch of darshanaa would be the intransitive, while the question was about ''showing interest'' and I found this in Platts (Prakrit), for your enjoyment:
    H
    درسنا दरसना darasnā [fr. daras = S. दर्श], v.n. To look (at), to see; to be visible, to appear, be seen.

    I think Alfaaz SaaHib will be able to tell us all if it was ever used in Urdu.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013

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