Hindi/Urdu: What are you thinking about?

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by Kahaani, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. Kahaani Senior Member

    Hi,

    I was wondering how you'd translate what are you thinking about? in Hindi or Urdu. Please let me know if there are specific sentences for Urdu or Hindi.

    My attempts;
    आप क्या सोच रहे हैं? - آپ کیا سوچ رہے ہیں؟
    आप के बारे में क्या सोच रहे हैं? - آپ کے بارے میں کیا سوچ رہے ہیں؟ (could anyone elaborate on ke bare men, i.e. when is it used?)
    आपकी नज़र में क्या सोच रहे हैं? - آپ کی نظر میں کیا سوچ رہے ہیں؟
     
  2. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    The first sentence is the best one, for both Urdu and Hindi. ke baare meN is fine too if you would be wishing to be more specific, but you have to use the interrogative pronoun kyaa which because of the postposition ke baare meN has to be inflected to kis. It will give aap kis ke baare meN soch rahe haiN?

    But it may prove a bit tricky because the inflected form 'kis' is shared by two interrogatives, kyaa and kaun!

    The third sentence is not clear for me.
     
  3. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    In Hindi, "aap kis baare meN soch race haiN" would be the best and simplest. The sentence "kis ke baare meN soch rahe haiN" would give me the impression of "about whom you are thinking", so I'd avoid it.
     
  4. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    For me, it is "aap kyaa soch rahe haiN?". I use this most of the time.
     
  5. Kahaani Senior Member

    I think I heard meri nazar men somewhere and remembered it as from my point of view or something similar. So, with Aapki nazar men kya soch rahe hain? I was trying to say something like what are you thinking from your point of view, or what is your opinion?

    How interesting to say that the postposition ke adds a different meaning to it. Could anyone explain to me when this is used, and when it isn't? Would you be able to say Aap in larkiyon ke bare men kya soch rahe hain? and would it have the same meaning without the postposition ke, i.e. Aap ye larkiyaan kya soch rahe hain?

    Even though the first sentence is probably the simplest and safest, does it actually translate about, though? Or isn't this required in Hindi/Urdu?
     
  6. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    No, without "ke" the sentence does not make sense.
    If you specifically want to translate "about" too, then you can go with GB's suggestion "aap kis baare meN soch rahe haiN"
     
  7. Chhaatr Senior Member

    Hindi
    You could say something like: "Aap kyaa soch rahe haiN apne nazariye se" or "Aap apne nazariye se kyaa soch rahe haiN", however both sound a bit odd to me.
    For this, you could say "Aapkii kyaa raay hai?" or "Aapkaa kyaa vichaar hai?"
     
  8. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    I think you want to say something like "what is your personal opinion?" (since "what are you thinking from your point of view?" does not mean much anything in English): for that, one could say "aap kii vyaktigat raae kyaa hai?" or "is baare meN aap ke vyaktigat vichaar kyaa haiN?". Hope this helps.
     
  9. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    On its own "aap kyaa soch rahe haiN?" means..

    What are you thinking about?

    If you wish to emphasise “about what” or “about whom”, one can say..

    aap kis chiiz ke baare meN soch rahe haiN? (What are you thinking about?)

    aap kis ke baare meN soch rahe haiN? (Who are you thinking about?)

    Here is Sahir Ludhiyanvi, a renowned Urdu poet and film lyricist (from the film “ham donoN”). This line nicely demonstrates use of the additional “ke” to differentiate a thing vs. a person, i.e. “kis liye” (For what?) and “kis ke liye” (For whom?)

    kis liye jiite haiN ham, kis ke liye jiite haiN?
    baar-haa aise savaalaat pih ronaa aayaa!

    What do we live for, whom do we live for?
    Many times such questions made me cry!

    Based on this structure, one could fit in “baare”

    kis liye jiite haiN ham, kis ke liye jiite haiN?

    aap kis bare soch rahe haiN? aap kis ke bare soch rahe haiN?

    Interestingly, the first form is not the norm in Urdu. We have mere baare/hamaare baare, tere baare/tumhaare baare, us ke baare/un ke baare but not us baare/un baare, kis baare/kin baare.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  10. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    I completely disagree. On its own, it means "What are you thinking?"
     
  11. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    ^I do agree that it means ''What are you thinking about?'' on its own, as per my post #2.
     
  12. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Although, this is not something worth arguing about, Chhaatr SaaHib is of the same view. (#post 4)
     
  13. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    You are again quoting someone out of context. "Aap kyaa soch rahe haiN" often implies "aap kis baare meN soch rahe haiN", just as the English "What are you thinking" implies often "What are you thinking about". My objection was simply because your post was categorical in only one possibility: I don't think that Chhatr has made any such categorical statement. In fact, post 6 (by Chhatr) makes it very clear what he thinks about it.

    Let's have this little issue at rest now; I hope the OP has anyway got her/his answers :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  14. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    भाई साहिब अगर आप किसी बात पर राज़ी न हों तो उस प्रस्तावना पर आलोचना प्रकट कीजिये न कि प्रस्तावना करने वाले पर।
     
  15. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    ^ My comments were addressed for QP, not you, marrish nor to any alter ego. Period.
     
  16. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    OK, he is to respond or not but I found your way of ''contributing'' to the thread not constructive. mere mutaabiq aap kyaa soch rahe haiN is idiomatic equivalent to ''what are you thinking about''. If you don't agree, and I see you don't., let it be so but don't attack the person saying it but the statement. Incidentally I said the same in my post what QP said afterwards.
     
  17. greatbear Senior Member

    India
    India - Hindi & English
    Which is something only present in your imagination: I challenge you to point out for all concerned here the phrase wherein I am "attacking the person". In fact, you are certainly attacking me personally by making this accusation, and all because I do not agree with whatever you-QP think.

    Spare the new members at least from such pointless posts, please, marrish.
     
  18. Kahaani Senior Member

    Thanks for all your answers!
     
  19. Wolverine9 Senior Member

    American English
    If you're looking for an exact, literal translation use: aap kis baare meN soch rahe haiN

    If an approximate equivalent is acceptable to you, then I would choose: aap kya soch rahe haiN

    You didn't mention who your intended recipient is. It should be noted that aap is generally a term of respect/politeness. If you intend to say it to a friend or someone younger than you then tuu or tum might be more appropriate than aap. When using tuu, it should be rahaa (if addressing a male) or rahii (if addressing a female) and hai instead of haiN. When using tum, it should be ho instead of haiN.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  20. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I beg to differ on this.

    "What are you thinking about?" has an exact, instinctive, first port of call translation as..

    aap kyaa soch rahe haiN?
     
  21. tonyspeed Senior Member

    JA- English & Creole
    There is a phrase for this in English. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.
     
  22. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you TS for the English phrase. How does it help with the translation of "What are you thinking about?" I have gone into detail in my previous post explaining ways to further focus on required meanings. Here I am merely stating that "aap kyaa soch rahe haiN" is not really an "approximate" translation. If you or others disagree on this, that's fine. It is possible that I am perceiving this sentence differently.
     

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