History of the word: "asidely" to mean: "indirectly"

Discussion in 'Etymology, History of languages and Linguistics (EHL)' started by Unoverwordinesslogged, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. Unoverwordinesslogged Senior Member

    English - Britain
    First post folks.

    Mewonders if anyone has ever come by the word "asidely" and its use to mean: "indirectly"?

    Happened upon it at e t y m o l i n e. Other than the aforesaid, there weirdishly seems to be nothing else about the word "asidely" on the net. I am keen on digging up examples, and thoughts on its usage and background.

    Methinks it works somewhat for (indirectly)... "as ever, the unforthrightmost of them unsurprisingly answered ever so asidely" ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
  2. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Etymonline says "Middle English had asidely "on the side, indirectly" (early 15c.)", i.e. the word existed in this meaning 600 years ago. I found nothing in the MED, the Middle English dictionary. I would therefore take the Etymonline claim with a bit of salt. Will check with the OED tomorrow; were I am today I have no access.
     
  3. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    It's under asīdelī.
    I can do it. The entry is very short:
    The "rare—1" means that the cited example is the only attestation the editors have found.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
  4. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Ah! Thank you. The same one and only attestation in MED and OED. One wonders how seriously this should be taken.:)
     
  5. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    It could be worse: "rare—0" :D

    It is certainly unusual to add -ly to an adverb. I wonder if there are any other examples.
     

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