Hit the gas / hit the road / Hit it

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    What does it mean this phrase "Hit the gas", is the same thing as "Let's go" or not.
     
  2. emerelda New Member

    USA English
    It literally means to press the gas pedal in a car and figuratively could mean "hurry up".
     
  3. DeMaty Junior Member

    US English
    Yes, it means "Let's go" or "Hurry up." When driving a car, you "hit the gas" to make it go or go faster, so that's where the saying came from.
     
  4. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Well, but if I am not inside a car, if I am having a regular conversation with someone and I have to go, can I say "Hit the gas".
     
  5. David Senior Member

    No. You would say, "I have to hit the road!"
     
  6. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    But if you're for example, inside the car, and you must hurry up, you could also say "Hit it", right?
     
  7. David Senior Member

    No, you would say "Hit the road."
     
  8. David Senior Member

    Sorry, Tonio. Metí la pata.

    Yes, if you are inside the car, you could say "hit it" for "Dale."
     
  9. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    "Hit the road" means "get out", or "leave", right? Not "hurry up". :confused:
     
  10. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    For the phrase "Hit the road" means originally to go travel or travelling, I have to go or I gotta go (You're absolutely right) or to go away. You can say for example: "If you don't do your job well, you can hit the road right now".

    Well, to answer your particular question, I heard it before, for real, so I assume, I could say it too. "Hit it" in this particular context (When you're inside a car) means to "speed up" also.

    If am right or if am wrong, please let me know.
     
  11. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Can someone please help me out on my previous post? "Hit it" means to speed up or to step on it, right? But also can mean To push or press a botton or to play it, in a CD player context, right? By the way, "hit the breaks" is the opposite of "Hit it" and "Hit the gas" and what does it means?
     
  12. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    "Hit it" is normally an expression you would use in a car. You jump into the car and you say to the driver, "Okay, hit it!" meaning "hit the gas". You could say the same when hitting a button to turn on the music. "Everyone is ready to dance so hit it!" meaning, turn the music on. So, in a sense, "Hit" it can mean "let's go".
    "Breaks" here is the wrong word. It should be "hit the brakes", meaning, "stop the car".
     
  13. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    For the phrase "Hit the road" means originally to go travel or travelling, I have to go or I gotta go, or to go away, right?

    If I am missing some other meanings of the phrase "hit the road", please let me know.
     
  14. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Yes, that's right. I have to go now, "I've gotta hit the road." Or to tell someone to go away because s/he is bothering you, "Hit the road!"
     
  15. Oculto04 Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain-Spanish
    So "hit the gas" = "acelera", that is also used figurately in Spanish to say "hurry up".

    Right?
     
  16. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    I am only speaking of my part of the world, please keep in mind. I suppose if you were to say "hit the gas" to someone outside of a car, it would be understood to mean "hurry up." I have never heard it used anywhere other than in the car. "C'mon, hit the gas!! Get going!" which means to me "Make this car go faster." I would not use this expression with someone who is slow in getting ready to go out. I would just say, "Hurry up!!!!!!!! Quit dawdling!"
     

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