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How to address a lawyer?

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by ANGAPO, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. ANGAPO Junior Member

    Argentina, Spanish
    When you address a doctor, you say "Doctor, I need your help"

    When you are talking to a lawyer, how do you address him?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    In EEUU laywer/attorney (edit: also counselor) has no informal title.
    A formal title is esquire ab: esq.
    This is mostly used in formal correspondence or legal papers. (Joe Brown, esq.)
    So you would call him/her by their name. ( Mr. Brown Ms.Smith)
    scotu
     
  3. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    A lawyer should be addressed as Mr. Esquire is not a form of address. One says, Mr. Jones, I need your help.
     
  4. Soy Yo Senior Member

    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    You would most likely say "Mr. XXX" or if you wish to show deference, you might address him as "sir". I think these are your only printable options.

    --What is your opinion, Mr. Blackstone?
    --Well, blah blah blah blah and blah.
    --Thank you. I understand now, sir.
    --Good. Five-hundred fifty dollars, please.
     
  5. ANGAPO Junior Member

    Argentina, Spanish
    Scotu, Idiomático and Soy Yo, thanks a lot!!!
     
  6. gettingby Senior Member

    Italy
    AmEnglish
    What about "Counselor"? Not as in "Counselor Jones," but as in "Counselor, thank you for your advice."
     
  7. EddieZumac

    EddieZumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    English/Spanish
    Yes, your example with "Counselor" seems to be the best.

    In Spanish, you always refer to a lawyer as "Licenciado".
    Buenos dias Licenciado Rodriguez.
    Gracias por su ayuda Licenciado.
     
  8. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Lawyers are called Counselor in court by the judge or other lawyers, but rarely do we use that term in other situations, and it is not comparable to how "Doctor" is used as a title by laypeople.

    In short, there is no real equivalent to Licenciado in English.
     

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