How to change affirmative sentences into negative sentences?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Leon Liang, May 11, 2012.

  1. Leon Liang

    Leon Liang Junior Member

    China
    chinese
    Hi all,

    Would you please help me to confirm the negative form about the following sentences.

    1: The old man can fit the position. (affirmative form)
    2: The old man can not fit the position. (negative form)
    3: The old man does not fit the position. (The sentence is also make sense to me, but how about its affirmative form, is it also "The old man can fit the position."?)

    4: We will play basketball tomorrow. (affirmative form)
    5: We will not play basketball tomorrow. (negative form)
    6: We do not play basketball tomorrow. (How about its affirmative form, is it also "We will play basketball tomorrow."?)

    7: You had better not buy it. (The sentence is correct, but why here use 'not' rather than 'don't'? 'buy' in the sentence is a verb, It is commonly use 'don't' to modify a verb like (3) and (6), so I thought it should be:"You had better don't buy it." Is the 'had better not' also like 'can not' in the sentence (2) and 'will not' in the sentence (5)? I'm not sure, after saying those words, I'm more confused...:confused:)


    Thanks in advance!

    Leon
     
  2. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The old man does not fit the position is the negative form of The only man fits the position.
    We do not play basketball tomorrow is the negative form of We play basketball tomorrow.

    In today's English, if there is no auxiliary verb (can, must, will, have, be, etc.) a do is introduced to form a negative (and if the main verb is not be or sometimes have.) If there is an auxiliary, just stick in a not. (Same also to form an interrogative.)

    I am happy --> I am not happy (BE as main verb)
    I should go to bed --> I should not go to bed (auxiliary should)
    I go to India tomorrow --> I do not go to India tomorrow

    Had better​ functions a bit like an auxiliary.

    (If you read earlier English, you might encounter a version without 'do', eg I love you --> I love you not. In today's English, the negative version is 'I do not love you.')
     
  3. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    Just a little thing further to natkretep's answer . . .

    'Can not' is spelt as one word - 'cannot'. Or 'can't'.
     
  4. Leon Liang

    Leon Liang Junior Member

    China
    chinese
    natkretep:

    Thanks a lot for your explanation, It is indeed precious and complete for me.

    But have you ever encountered a sentence appears two verbs? 'BE' (am is are) and 'auxiliary verb' (can, must, will, have, should, etc.) or other verb like 'go', 'play', etc.

    On this occasion, how should we do? I'm not sure about the correctness of the following sentence.
    1: I like to go see a movie.
    2: You will absolutely regret in the future.

    Thanks in advance!

    Leon
     
  5. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Leon, there the main verb BE (I am happy --> I am not happy).

    BE is an auxiliary in a passive construction (He was awoken at 8 --> He was not awoken at 8). The modal auxiliary can be included before BE (He must be awoken at 8 --> He must not be awoken at 8). BE is also an auxiliary in a progressive/continuous construction (He was singing --> He was not singing), and can also include a modal (He might be singing​ --> He might not be singing).

    Are your other two sentences about forming the negative too? I don't see the connection.
     
  6. Leon Liang

    Leon Liang Junior Member

    China
    chinese
    natkretep:

    "Are your other two sentences about forming the negative too? I don't see the connection."

    You said that you can't see the connection. so I give another two sentences, not that a new topic, the same question change them into negative form. they all have two verbs, if the sentence is wrong, you needn't do anything just give a ":cross:" please.

    1: I am sure whether they will agree with such a plan. (I am not sure whether they will agree with such a plan.)
    2: You will absolutely regret in the future. (You will not absolutely regret in the future.)

    Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2012
  7. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Please start a new thread, Leon. This looks like a new topic. Remember also that the Forum doesn't deal with proofreading, so you'll have to say which bits are troubling you.
     
  8. Leon Liang

    Leon Liang Junior Member

    China
    chinese
    It is clear to me, thanks natkretep!
     

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