How to pronounce Mikhail?

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by TheHypez, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. TheHypez Junior Member

    Singapore
    English, Chinese
    Does it sounds like "michael" or "mi-khail" or "mik-hail"? Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2009
  2. palomnik Senior Member

    Vietnam
    English
    mi-kha-IL. Three syllables.
     
  3. TheHypez Junior Member

    Singapore
    English, Chinese
    this is the point, i heard some russian pronounce it as michael whereas english man pronounce it as mi-kha-il which may influence some russian aboard...so i'm curious how native russian pronounce it
     
  4. lectrice Senior Member

    Toronto, Canada
    Russian/Moscow
    Ми-ха-ил - Mi-kha-il
     
  5. Saluton Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    Russians may say "Michael" because that's the name English speakers are accustomed to. They will hardly grasp "Mi-kha-il". Moreover, some people think that names have to be "translated". Even our university teachers of English and German called my groupmate Michael during classes, in English ("MY-kl") and German ("MEE-kha-el"), respectively. But the name is still pronounced "Mi-kha-il" and that's how Native Russian Speakers Pronounce It In Russian. Actually, the name (Михаил) cannot be pronounced otherwise because the Russian letter х stands for kh, а stands for а etc. Russian spelling is much closer to pronunciation than English spelling is to English pronunciation. Hope I am clear.
     
  6. Kolan Senior Member

    Montréal (Québec)
    Russian (CCCP)
    Do you mean Ignatieff?
     
  7. TheHypez Junior Member

    Singapore
    English, Chinese
    thanks

    thanks, your explaination helps me alot.

    nope, МИХАИЛА РЯБКО
     
  8. palomnik Senior Member

    Vietnam
    English
    In my experience, Russian teachers in Russia will call foreign students by their name in their original language, whereas Russian teachers overseas (in the USA, anyway) will call their students by their "Russian" name, a practice that can be a bit ridiculous, since while most common foreign names have equivalents in Russian, the equivalent may be uncommon and often a bit ridiculous sounding to a Russian, e.g., my own name - Thomas - is Фома in Russian, and while the English version is commonplace enough, the Russian version is usually only found among Orthodox monks and serfs in nineteenth century literature. No Russian teacher in Russia ever called me Фома.

    And after all, if I were Russian and my name was Никита, would my English teacher call me "Niketas"?
     
  9. Saluton Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    I see... So Russians who teach in the USA would call a Michael Миша and a Thomas Фома?
     
  10. palomnik Senior Member

    Vietnam
    English
    Perhaps not the Russian nationals. But Americans who teach Russian (and there are quite a few) do.
     

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