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How to write a date

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Casquilho, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    It's a very simple question: exempli gratia, let's say I want to write about the Normandy landing in the World War II: "6 June 1944 Operation". How could I say this in Latin?
     
  2. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    a.d. xiii Id. Iun.
     
  3. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Oops!

    That should have been "a.d. viii Id. Iun.". Apologies all round.
     
  4. djmc Senior Member

    France
    English - United Kingdom
    There is a little rhyme "March, July, October, May Nones the ninth, Ides the fifteenth day (otherwise the Nones are the seventh and the Ides the thirteenth). Thus in June the Nones would be the 7th. The sixth would be Pridie nonas Junio. As far as years go the Romans either dated by the Consuls for example Quinto Claudio Marco Flavio consulibus, or by the number of years since the traditional founding of Rome which was 753BC.
     
  5. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    I remember MARMAIULO.
    Which is quite inapplicable for the non-ancient dates.

    Examples of the non-ancient dates (Tuesday 6-6-1944):

    Datum die Martis, die VIo (sexto) mensis Iunii, anno Domini MCMXLIV
    die 6o Iunii A.D. 1944
    die 6 Iunii 1944
    ...
     
  6. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I'm not getting it well... does "a. d. viii Id. Iun." mean anno domini, 8 days before the Ides of June? There's no alternative in modern Latin? When a modern book was written in Latin, e. g. Copernicus' De Revolutionibus or Newton's Principia, how are the place and date of its printing spelled? And about my first example, how can I write the year, just MCMXLIV, without any preposition, is correct?
     
  7. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    No, a.d. means ante diem, pridie (abl.) means 'preceding day'.

    For the "modern" Latin dates see my post #5. The A.D. or AD (anno Domini) is not necessary. In Latin the time is usually expressed by the ablative case without any preposition: anno MCMXLIV (millesimo ... quarto) = in the year 1944, die VIo (sexto) (mensis) Decembris = on the 6th day of (the month) December, die Martis = on Tuesday.
    Domini, Martis, mensis, Decembris are genitive, of course.
    In my copy of Comenii Orbis Pictus is: Leutschoviae, Anno 1685.
    Leutschoviae (in Leutschau, Levoča, now in Slovakia) is locative.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  8. ~ceLine~

    ~ceLine~ Senior Member

    Istanbul, Turkey
    Turkish/French
    I read what you've written but I still didn't really understand.

    Would "A.D. III NON. MART. MCMXCII" be a good translation for 5 March 1992? Should I also write A.U.C. (Ab Urbe Condita) to the end?
    I'm confused if it's gregorian or julian calender. Which one is it?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  9. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Greetings to all: I am addressing myself here to the Original Poster's latest, #8

    Greetings.

    Your "A.D. III Non. Mart. MCMXCII" looks perfect to me for "5th March 1992", and there would not be, in normal current usage, a need to refer this to an a.u.c. date. But, may I ask, why is it a matter of relating to Julian or Gregorian calculations?

    If you would care to tell us for what purpose this calendrical calculation is to be made, some of us may be able to give you further help (and, of course, would be glad to do so).

    Looking forward to hearing more,
     
  10. ~ceLine~

    ~ceLine~ Senior Member

    Istanbul, Turkey
    Turkish/French
    Thank you for your fast reply!
    It was just my curiosity. Last year I had some latin classes at the university but this year I couldn't keep them for some reason so I am studying by myself and in every book, every website it is written something else and I got confused about which one we are using. While I was studying the dates in latin I tried to translate my birthday and then I couldn't be sure about the calender, if should I also write "a.u.c" at the end of a modern date, if it would be wrong or not. The datails are really confusing. So we write the years (1992 = MCMXCII) like in our calenders, I wasn't mistaken, was I?
     
  11. djmc Senior Member

    France
    English - United Kingdom
    The traditional date of the founding of Rome was 753 BC. Thus if you are trying to use a date AUC (ab urbe condita) you need to add 753 to whatever the date is. The Julian calendar was introduced in 45 BC, the Gregorian calendar in 1582 AD both to establish a system of tying the solstices of the solar year to a fixed number of days. The Mohammedan year is lunar (a fixed number of 28 day months) and is not related.
     
  12. ~ceLine~

    ~ceLine~ Senior Member

    Istanbul, Turkey
    Turkish/French
    Thank you very much!!
    So A.D. MCMXCII and MMDCCXLV A.U.C are the same date 1992, aren't they?
     
  13. djmc Senior Member

    France
    English - United Kingdom
    Yes, looks allright to me.
     
  14. ~ceLine~

    ~ceLine~ Senior Member

    Istanbul, Turkey
    Turkish/French
    I finally got it so, thank you again!
     

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