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I have a craving for...

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by miss sparkles, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. miss sparkles

    miss sparkles Senior Member

    Pennsylvania, USA
    English-USA
    How would you say, "I have a craving for (ice cream, chocolate, etc..)"?
     
  2. Kibramoa

    Kibramoa Senior Member

    Deep South, U.S.A.
    Spanish - MX
    Se me antoja (un helado, chocolate, etc.)
    Me apetece (...)
    Tengos ganas de (...)

    :)
     
  3. miss sparkles

    miss sparkles Senior Member

    Pennsylvania, USA
    English-USA
    Thanks Kibramoa, that helps a lot. But do you think it would it be strange if I used the verb ansiar?
     
  4. mofli_2009 New Member

    Spanish
    yes, it would be weird... doesn´t sound natural

    Ansío un helado.... no no no....

    Tengo antojo de helado, se me antoja un helado, me apetece helado, tengo ganas de helado...

    Salud!!
     
  5. aged student Junior Member

    español
    I think it´s perfectly acceptable to use "ansiar" in this case
     
  6. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Could I also simply say in English "I'm craving ice cream"?
     
  7. aged student Junior Member

    español
    I think you need add (an), I mean: I´m craving an ice cream.
     
  8. Bigote Blanco Senior Member

    Colombo, yes, it would sound fine. One might also hear, "I've got a craving for some ice cream."
    More common might be, and I'd probably say, "I feel like having some ice cream." "I feel like eating some ice cream." I personally don't use the word, "crave" much at all, I use "feel like" 99.9% of the time. Crave is stronger than "feel like" so, instead of using crave, I'd say, "I really feel like a hamburger with green chile and cheese."
    "I really feel like going to a movie tonight." "I really feel like a glass of wine."

    As a joke and a play on words, while at a resturant, I often squeeze my partner's arm and ask, "What do you feel like tonight?"

    crave = I really feel like (in my vocabulary)
     
  9. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Yes, that's actually what I always say when it comes to be crazy for food; but when it comes to a pregnant woman, 'to crave' is the verb to be used. What I didn't now were if this verb could also be used in different contexts.


    Thanks Bigote.
     
  10. saturne Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish
    As Bigote says. Crave = I really feel like.
    I feel like an ice cream = Me apetece un helado (voy a pedir uno). Es mas indeterminado y no siempre se realiza en el tiempo. Apetecer creo varía de un país a otro.
    Tengo ganas de un helado. (pero no puedo comerlo, comprarlo, etc.) Tiene un efecto mas inmediato.
    To emphatize it I would say. ¡Tengo unas ganas de un helado! or I really feel like an ice cream.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2011
  11. Ornitorrinco

    Ornitorrinco Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    Costa Rica, Español
    Me dio un antojo de... (incoativo)

    Estoy atojado(-a) de... (durativo)


    EDIT: "Apetecer" is a verb I have only listened twice in my life. Both from spaniard speakers.
     
  12. saturne Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish
    That's why I said (creo varía de un país a otro). En españa lo usamos frecuentemente.
     
  13. Bigote Blanco Senior Member

    Yes, Colombo, I'd also always would use "crave" if I were speaking about a pregnant womens' strong/unusual desire for certain foods. And, I'd use "pica" for a strong/unusual desire to eat non-food items(pregnant or non-pregnant). If I was speaking about a horse, I'd say, "cribbing" for unusual desire to eat non-food items(pregnant or non-pregnant horse:D).
     
  14. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Well, that 'pica' threw me off a little bit. I've never heard that word in English and I can't find it in the dictionay either. Do you have any example?

    Sorry to bug you with this again!!

    Cheers,

    C-A
     
  15. mirx Senior Member

    Español
    I think he means it in Spanish, as in the desire is so strong that it itches.
     
  16. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Well, it must be because I've never heard pica in that context in Spanish either, it makes far more sense thought!!

    Thank you.
     
  17. Bigote Blanco Senior Member

    Colombo, You're not buggin me and I'm still awake- but not for long. I didn't mean to throw you off, but to introduce you to a new word related to crave/craving, which I guessed you may not have encountered. "pica" is a common eating disorder, often seen in children, although also in adults and also in various animals. It is characterized by eating non-food items, such as dirt, clay, pencil lead, etc.
    It should be easily found in a diccionary. Google it for some examples.

    Although not always related to low levels of nutrition, here is how it might be used in a sentence:
    "The severely malnourished children all experienced some degree of pica and regularily ate dirt and very small rocks."
    or
    "The severely malnourished children all had unusual cravings and regularily ate dirt and very small rocks."
     
  18. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Thanks for the thorough explanation - very useful.
    While you're off to bed, I'm off work... see you around Bigote :)

    C-A
     
  19. chitanegra Senior Member

    Mazatlan,sinaloa,mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    In few words= MUCHAS GANAS. Bye friend!
     
  20. megacd

    megacd Junior Member

    Spain - Spanish
    I have a craving for (ice cream, chocolate...) = Tengo mono de (helado, chocolate...)
     
  21. señorgringo Senior Member

    España
    English & German
    Qué tal de 'tengo capricho de chocolate'?
     
  22. chotyWoH Senior Member

    Islas Canarias, España
    Castellano, España
    Creo que es mejor usar el "some" en vez de "an". Si es un polo sí, pero si no se especifica un vaso, copa o cucurucho, en sí el helado es incontable. Aunque aquí en España lo generalicemos. ¿No creéis?
     
  23. señorgringo Senior Member

    España
    English & German
    Actually I would skip the 'an' or 'some' in this case and simply say: I really feel like ice cream.

    At least that's how it's being used over in the U.S. Now there's nothing wrong at all with saying I really feel like an ice cream. But if you want to emphasize that you just want one right now, this second, then you would probably say I really feel like having an ice cream. Someone already mentioned above that pregnant women develop sudden cravings for certain foods. Some of those cravings seem rather strange - here's an article on the subject.

    English is actually rather subtle just like Spanish and by emphasizing certain words or using helper verbs you can shift the meaning. To go back to 'having a craving' - this is more used in a general sense. It suggests that you usually do not have that feeling and that you suddenly (i.e. since last week or since yesterday or an hour ago) feel the need to consume chocolate, ice-cream, sauerkraut, what have you.

    So there is a clear separation in my mind between 'having a craving for something' and to 'feel like having xxx'.

    chotyWoH - how about 'capricho' - would that work on the Spanish side?
     
  24. chotyWoH Senior Member

    Islas Canarias, España
    Castellano, España
    Yes, but it doesn't fit in the context of "having a craving". "Capricho" is a noun. But in Spain (at last In The Canary Islands) it's never used after verb "to have" "Tengo un capricho" It sounds strange. We use "Tengo un antojo" But it's said "darse un capricho" (Me dí un capricho o me estoy dando un capricho") when you do something that you normally can't do because of the money or time. The verb Encapricharse is a pronominal verb, and it has another meaning: "Insist on and persist in something".

    Although it's true that you could use "capricho" if and when something means a break between something you're doing or sharing. For example, if you're sharing a low fats diet. "Hoy me salto (o rompo) la dieta y me doy el capricho de comerme un helado". "Comerme un helado es un capricho que me doy todos los domingos".

    Tengo antojo de helado (me apetece repentinamente un helado) y me voy a dar el capricho de comerme uno ahora mismo.

    Principal Translations
    encapricharsev prnl (aferrarse, desear) (doing [sth]) insist on, persist in vi + prep
    cling to the idea of, set your mind on, dig your heels in about v expr
    (continue) persevere in, keep on vi + prep
    Se encaprichó en comprar esa casa aunque no le alcanzara para pagarla.
    She insisted on (or: persisted in) buying that house although she didn't have enough to pay for i
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2014
  25. señorgringo Senior Member

    España
    English & German
    Muy interesante - muchísimas gracias! :)
     
  26. chotyWoH Senior Member

    Islas Canarias, España
    Castellano, España
    Muchas gracias a ti por las correcciones. :thumbsup: Añado a lo anterior que "encapricharse" también podría traducirse como "infatuate"
     
  27. 221BBaker

    221BBaker Senior Member

    Spanish (Canarian) & Catalan
    Sin embargo, aunque antojarse algo se puede decir como apetecer algo, ‘antojos’ se asocia mucho aquí a los deseos intensos por una comida determinada que suele tener una mujer embarazada.
     

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