I have always used it/I always use it

Discussion in 'English Only' started by hesitate, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Greetings,

    I have always used it. and I always use it.

    The only difference is that the first sentence implies that I started to use it at some point in the past, while the second one says nothing about the past and only implies a general fact. Am I right? Thanks!
     
  2. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The first refers to my habit in all past time. I have never used anything else.

    The second refers to my current habit. I may have used something else in the past, but my current habit is to use it.
    This still meanas that I have already used it, at least in the recent past. I couldn't say "I always use olive oil," if I had never used olive oil, even if I had decided to use it in future.
     
  3. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 10, 2012
  4. Sparky Malarky Senior Member

    Indiana
    English - US
    I have always used it says that I have always used it in the past. You could easily say "I have always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible! I am never using it again!" or "I have always used Flink's tuna, but I tried Peaquad's tuna and it was wonderful! I'm switching brands."

    I always use it says that I have always used it in the past and it strongly implies that I intend to continue to use it in the future. You might say "I don't care if there's a sale on Peaquad's tuna. I always use Flink's tuna."
     
  5. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Ha. I've always thought I could use the first one to indicate my habit in the past up to the present. What do you think?

    I want to say that 'I've always used it' - and I still do.
     
  6. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    As in: I've always loved you. That means that I still love you, doesn't it?
     
  7. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    I have always used it - I used it before and I still use it; however, it is not certain that I will continue to use it.
    I always use it - a habit that you mean to keep; it may be a fairly recently acquired one.
     
  8. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you don't add any qualification to "I've always used it," that is exactly what it means.
     
  9. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    What kind of qualification?
     
  10. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    See above:
    "I have always used Flink's tuna." - no qualification, so you are still a user of Flink's tuna.

    "I have always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible! I am never using it again!" - the additional qualification, in red, means you are no longer a Flink's tuna user.
     
  11. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Oh, I understand it now. That's what I thought. Thanks.
     
  12. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    I have played in Fnatic for over one and a half years and I am very happy and proud of what we accomplished, even though we had our rough patches, we still had a lot of fun and in the end we came out strong. Ihave never had any troubles when playing in Fnatic, they have all been very helpful towards me and I have only good things to say.
    __
    Briefly: this player left Fnatic two days ago. But he used the present perfect in his 'goodbye' message. So, if I hadn't told you that he wasn't on the team, would you have thought that he was?
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2012
  13. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    The concept of "present" is flexible - it is not always "an instant" (as in ~5 x 10-44 seconds, the shortest unit of time possible!) but can cover the time from when the player actually physically stopped something to when they make the farewell announcement.

    However, to your question. From the context/quote it is clear that either the game/team has finished or his participation in the game/team has (the use of the tenses that are not present perfect after the first verb). What you might tell me clarifies which alternative is the case.
     
  14. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    I think he could have used 'I played' and 'I never had any troubles'. Am I right?
     
  15. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    That is the flexibility I meant! He could have used either because he is still in the present - at a point/stretch in time that includes the stopping.
    In the future, that is probably what he will say, but in a farewell speech, one includes more things in "the present".
     
  16. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Could it also be because at the time of the writing he just left the team?
     
  17. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    That's right, although it was probably more than 5 x 10-44 seconds later - that was my point about what we mean by "the present"! He regards his closing/farewell speech/statement as part of the present and time when he was a member.
     
  18. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    What's the difference between these two?

    I have always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible!

    I had always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible!
     
  19. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    The first one is linked to the present. It does not tell us with certainty whether you continue to use it, but it does not describe a situation where your use has ended. You may not yet have decided whether to continue using it.

    In the second one, the author is describing situation in the past and therefore implies that the usage has ended.

    If you said the first sentence today, and subsequently decided to stop using the tuna, and some time (days months years etc) later recounted the story, you would use the second sentence - to refer back to that point in time.
     
  20. hesitate Senior Member

    Serbian
    Oh, I should have used the full sentences.

    1. I have always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible. I am never using it again.
    2. I had always used Flink's tuna, but the last can I got was terrible. I am never using it again.

    Is your explanation the same as above?
     
  21. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Those are now pairs of sentences :D. For 2, the correct second sentence would be "I have never used it since then." Both sentences in 2 should refer to a past timepoint. It is what you would say when relating the story of when sentence pair #1 had been said.
     

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