I have never been sick that i know of, no cold, flu...etc.

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by Baltic Sea, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Witam wszystkich?

    Chciałbym spytać was co znaczy poniższe zdanie. Szczególnie chodzi mi o "that I know of", poprzedzone "never".

    I have never been sick that i know of, no cold, flu...etc.

    Zdecydowanie nigdy nie chorowałem, nigdy nie miałem żadnego przeziębienia, grypy, itp.

    lub

    Nic mi o tym nie wiadomo, żebym kiedykolwiek chorował, nigdy nie miałem żadnego przeziębienia, grypy, itp.
    Termin ten pochodzi z 5 surprising secrets of people who never get sick, podtytuł What's the secret to good health?
    W akapicie, 3 znajduje się ten tekst, o którym mowa:
    I have never been sick that i know of, no cold, flu...etc.

    Dziękuję. The source: http://www.besthealthmag.ca/get-healthy/cold-and-flu/5-surprising-secrets-of-people-who-never-get-sick
     
  2. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Ja tak rozumiem tę część:
    Z tego, co mi wiadomo...
    Z tego, co wiem/pamiętam/sobie przypominam/się orientuję...
    O ile wiem, (to)...

    Moim zdaniem, 'zdecydowanie' wyraża zbyt duże prawdopodobieństwo, żeby je tu użyć.

    PS: w polskim przed 'itp.' nie stawiamy przecinka.
     
  3. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Dziękuję, Thomas1.
     
  4. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Z tego co wiem, z tego co mi wiadomo nigdy nie byłem chory. I would personally say: As far as I remember. It sounds somewhat strange to me not to know about someone's own cold, or flue. A person may perhaps not remember.
     
  5. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    That's what the person must've meant. ;)
     
  6. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    They should have written what they meant -- I know, often people mean one thing and write something else. It may pay to be psychic. :D
     
  7. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    To of the statement is perfectly clear without any clarification. It's putative the person doesn't remember it. It is actually possible not to remember what diseases you've had in your life, isn't. it
    Liliana, I just love Patrick Jane so I have to say this: There's no such thing as a psychic. ;-)
     
  8. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Well, I would rather say: not that I remember, rather than I know of in this context. As to psychics-- of course there are psychics, some even work for the Police Department. Telepathy has been scientifically proven.
     
  9. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    So has UFO. :D
     
  10. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I agree, but we very often say such things and don't even realise it. People while talking aren't logical. If you listened to the recording of a casual conversation, you'd notice how incoherent it was.
    Besides that, it may make sense in a context where the person is talking about their early childhood. It is a natural thing that we don't know such things (be it just because we don't remember it).
     
  11. LeTasmanien

    LeTasmanien Senior Member

    Gmina Karczew, Poland
    English British
    As would most English speaking people LilianaB. I have never heard or read the expression "I have never been sick that I know of" before seeing it in this thread but I suppose that a person may be sick in some cases and not be aware of it.

    Looking at the source as provided by Baltic the person was writing in a very casual manner, (some people might even regard it as vulgar), so was so the language used is a bit careless.

    Incidentally, the writer is almost certainly Australian or a New Zealander. You can tell by the use of the slang terms "veggies" meaning vegetables. Also "strep throat" meaning a throat infection caused by streptococcus bacteria is yet another very popular term down under.
     
  12. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    "Not that I know of", is a sort of cliche, often used in court, when people don't want to take full responsibility for what they testified to (just in case there was a slight chance that they must know about something based on the evidence). This is the context I am mostly used to hearing this expression in.
     

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