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'I hope + Present' vs 'I hope + Future'

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Lovely R, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. Lovely R Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    I came across a sentense where 'I hope' is followed by Present Simple:

    'I'll be abroad. I hope the party goes well.'

    Is there a difference between this one and 'I hope the party will go well'?
     
  2. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The difference is that "... goes well," sounds more natural :)
    I hope your team wins.
    I hope you get better soon.
    I hope it doesn't rain this afternoon.
    I hope you find this post helpful.
    I hope you enjoy the WordReference forums :)
     
  3. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    I'm not sure what you mean by "Is there a difference?". Either way, he hopes that the party is a good one!
     
  4. Lexiphile Senior Member

    Germany
    England English
    Interesting question, Lovely.

    Although the party is quite clearly in the future, "I hope the party will go well" seems very strange. Perhaps the reason is that, when the party is actually going well, it is in the present.
     
  5. Lovely R Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Yes, I've already found your post as well as the whole forum very helpful
     
  6. Lovely R Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    I know, it's natural for you as a native speaker to say like that not pondering on the tenses, but is there any rule, that's the question. I ran into phrases both with Future and Present after 'I hope', that's why I'm wondering.
     
  7. Lexiphile Senior Member

    Germany
    England English
    No rules that I know of.
    Most rules in English were created "after the fact," to describe what was already common usage. And it is the fact that this "common usage" seems to violate whatever rules there are that makes your question interesting. You can say it with the future tense, but we just don't (usually).

    English is full of anomalies and "why" questions that simply cannot be answered. That's why this forum is such fun -- it gives bored and long-winded foreros a chance to write reams and reams of theory about why we say "A" instead of "B."
     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Sometimes "hope" is followed by the future tense:

    "I hope you'll come to the meeting."

    I cannot point to a grammatical rule because I was never taught any grammatical rules about the tense that should follow "hope". All I can suggest, Lovely R, is that you refer to a good manual of English grammar.
     
  9. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    But in Sound Shift's case one could also say I hope you come to the meeting.

    I can't think of a case (that doesn't mean there isn't one) where the future is mandatory, and can't be replaced with the present. Even if the future is very distant:

    I know that in five years time you are planning to come to Australia. I hope that when you are here you will come to see me - one could perfectly well say you come to see me.

    P.S. It occurs to me that when the hope is for something negative and the hope is in the nature of a command or warning that the future and present aren't really interchangeable:

    I hope you won't smoke in your bedroom isn't the same as I hope you don't smoke in your bedroom.

    Interestingly from the point of view of sequence of tenses when we say I hoped we usually need the conditional in the clause:

    I hoped you would come to see me.
     
  10. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I quite agree, Thomas, but I'm wondering whether "I hope you come to the meeting" means exactly the same as "I hope you'll come to the meeting". I think I sense in the latter an element of pleading ("Please come to the meeting"). I do not sense this element in the former. Or am I imagining things?
     
  11. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    No, I don't think you are, SS. I too sense a higher level of pleading in the one that uses the future - I hope you'll come to the meeting.

    It's a good point.
     
  12. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    In I hope you come to the meeting, it is obvious (in most contexts at least) that the meeting is in the future, so there is no need to signal the future with will. You can put will in if will signals something other than futurity, for example consent.
     
  13. Lovely R Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    You know, I looked it up in grammar manuals, but haven't found anything concerning this exact case. It just seems to me that Present Simple is used here to convey the events planned beforehand.
     

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