I kiss your hand.

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Encolpius, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    I wonder which Slavic languages used in the past this Austrian greeting or maybe still use (I doubt). In Austrian German it is Küssdiehand and it was and it is still used in Hungarian, maybe older people can use it in Austria, too.

    Czech: Ruku líbám.
    Slovak: Ruky bozkávam.
    Polish: Całuję rączki.

    Thanks.
     
  2. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
    Serbian: Ljubim ruke. (=I kiss the hands.)

    It sound rather funny now but it was in use before the WW2.
     
  3. Orlin Senior Member

    София
    български
    Bulgarian: целувам ти ръка.
     
  4. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Russian: "целую ручку" /tseluyu ruchku/
    That seems to be close to the Polish variant.
     
  5. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    I am a little bit surprised there is a Russian and Bulgaria expression. Is that only the literal translation or was that greeting used in Russia and Bulgaria in the past??? thanks.
     
  6. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    I can say nothing for Bulgaria, but in Russia it still will do as a final part of personal letter, something like that:
    "Здравствуйте, дорогая Наталья Петровна!
    (text)
    Целую ручку,
    искренне Ваш,
    Иван Петрович Сидоров."
     
  7. Orlin Senior Member

    София
    български
    I think that such a greeting was used in the past in Bulgaria and it is still used now but is definitely not common.
     
  8. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Slovenian: Poljubljam roko.
     
  9. Christo Tamarin

    Christo Tamarin Senior Member

    Bulgarian
    Unless to a lady by a gentleman, it expesses sub-ordination.
     
  10. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Wow, thank you so much for the very interesting Bulgarian and Russian comments. I just thought that type of greeting was exclusively used in the former Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy. Maybe I should open a new topic in All Languages.
     
  11. Klara-06 New Member

    Italian
    In Slovak "ruky bozkavam" is still used in short form "bozkavam" especially, if children greet adults.
     
  12. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    In Poland we not only said całuję rączki, but we also did it :)
     
  13. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    I think it was common in the whole Monarchy.
     
  14. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Just a minor correction - it is written "Küss die Hand".

    Some older people indeed might use this still; however, it is predominantly used by gentlemen who try to be gallant, with an ironic side note.
    So for example at a ball one might use "Küss die Hand" in a joking way, trying to be nice and funny, and at the same time still being gallant.

    At the most prestigious ball in Austria, the Opernball, probably some people of the high society still use this in all earnest as a gentlemen's greeting - I'm not sure about that myself but I imagine this could be the case.

    Also sometimes show-masters on TV use this greeting.
    Note, you can only say "Küss die Hand", or you can indeed kiss the hand. (A gentleman however will not quite touch the hand of the lady with his lips - so it is only a kiss "pretended"; only a snob will actually kiss the hand, probably even with a disgusting smacking sound.)

    Anyway, the greeting is only reserved for very special occasions.
    I'm sure it was, and I'm also sure it was pretty common outside the Habsburg Monarchy (probably was taken over from French etiquette?! not sure myself about that ;-).


    But that just for background; let's return to its use in Slavic languages. :)
     
  15. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    Yet in 19th century Slovak brightly used both, "bozkávať" and "ľúbať", and it not only in carpet-knight phrases.
     
  16. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Was it not Ljubim roko? I know ljubiti means now to love...but earlier?



    A couple of years ago we have come to the conclusion in this topic that the greeting (which I think did exist in English) I kiss your hand, Madame exists in all Slavic languages. Of course Austrians (and Hungarians) said Küss die Hand, too. Did gentleman use that greeting in the past in your country and how was the translation? I wonder if I will get at least two answers. :D Thanks, anyway.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 5, 2013
  17. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek it goes like this:
    «Ἀσπάζομαι τὴν δεξιὰν σας, Μαντάμ»
    [a'spazome tin ðeksi'an sas ma'dam]
    lit. "I kiss your right (hand is omitted), madame"

    I've also read «Σᾶς φιλῶ τὴν χεῖρα, Μαντάμ»
    [sas fi'lo tin çira ma'dam]
    lit. "I kiss your hand, madame"
    If the woman receiving the greeting was a younger one, then "madame" was replaced by «δεσποινίς» [ðespi'nis] (fem.) --> mademoiselle, miss, the unmarried woman in general
    The former is more formal than the latter.
    The language is katharevousa
     
  18. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    SSKJ does indeed mention ljubiti roko as an example of the archaic meaning of ljubiti. Of course, the phrase itself is old-fashioned, but Google still finds more hits for Poljubljam roko than Ljubim roko.
     
  19. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Polish: całuję Pani dłoń, całuję Pani rękę. (that would be the original expression) Całuje rączki is lower class Polish (something you would say to a bar owner, or a woman selling geese in the market -- especially in the past -- I am not sure about the current situation), almost slang. (like the parts of working class Warsaw --Praga, Wola, especialy in 1920s-1940s). Maybe it was later accepted on a more general level as a kind of greeting. In Russian it is celuju vashe ruki. (spelled phonetically)
     
  20. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    Here in Egypt (and may be some other Arab countries), "kissing woman's hand" is not exist in our culture, but we use the expression "I kiss your hand" to mean "I beg you" and you say it to a man or a woman

    so, In Egyptian Arabic:
    أبوس إيدك يا مدام [aboos eedik ya madaam] means "I beg you, Madame" but lit. "I kiss your hand, Madame"
     
  21. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    The expression Całuję rączki (pronounced cajirączki) was typical for the ihabitants of Lvov (Lwów) and other Eastern Galician towns - it's probably not used any more.
     
  22. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I don't know, not as a general rule -- maybe some people did. I know exactly how my Lithuanian grandfather spoke when he met some Polish women (he spoke Polish quite well, just like all of them did there before 1940) He would never say anything like that. Pozwoli Pani ze pocałuję w rękę (never całuję rączki. It sounds totally disrespectful and not serious at all. It is true that it was an absolute necessity for many people from those regions to kiss every woman's hand they met. I have in mind the generation born around 1900. It must have been similar in Lvov, although who knows.
     
  23. sesperxes

    sesperxes Senior Member

    Burgos (Spain)
    Spanish-Spain
    What you call "an Austro-HUngarian greeting" was too (and sometime still is) a Western Europe greeting (at least from Italy to Portugal the custom of kissing woman's hands is part of our code of manners), that you can find even in Southern America.
     
  24. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Kissing hands and saying something, I think, are two different things. I am interested in the words! What did caballeros say in Spanish?
     
  25. Bresca Senior Member

    In Spanish gentlemen said "Beso su mano" (I kiss Your hand") and even "A sus pies, Señora" (to Your feet, Madam") -where the capital letter means the pronoun of respect (Vi, Vous, Sie...) - and accompanied the sentence with a bow. Today in Spain it's steel used the second sentence, especially in protocolary situations.
     
  26. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I don't think I've ever encoutered such an expression in Portuguese. It immediately makes me think of Mr. Alphonse (and Captain Bertorelli) from Allo, allo... which makes me wonder if the expression exists in French. :D
     
  27. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    :thumbsup: That's what we have been waiting for. And here is an interesting topic. Of course, by a Hungarian where this greeting is still a common standard......
     
  28. sesperxes

    sesperxes Senior Member

    Burgos (Spain)
    Spanish-Spain
    Both Spanish greetings indicated by Bresca are very, very old-fashioned: you can find them in the dialogues of the plays of Lope de Vega, Calderón, Tirso or Cervantes (XVI century) and as a written formula in letters, let's say, till the Fifties-Sixties of last century.
    I remember that in the Army we were told that in case of having to salute Her Majesty the Queen or Their Highnesses the Pricesses, the formula "A sus pies" (to your feet) was compulsory but... we have only one queen and two princesses to use the greeting!
    So, forget addressing to a Spanish gal with one of these formulas: if you use them, she'll think you're a freaky!
    Kezét csokol..ade!
     
  29. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    So what? I know it is old-fashioned in the West, while in the East from Turkey on it is quite common....and now don't get shocked....that greeting has been used let's say 50 years ago or so how children greeted their parents....in Hungary...even if the child was 50-year old. ;) and I can imagine it is still used in Turkey...
     

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