1. Unregistered Guest

    Can someone please translate that? Thank you.
     
  2. jean1938 Senior Member

    MONTRÉAL
    QUÉBEC / FRANÇAIS
    Probably you mean in conversation?

    If someone tells you : Tu me manques beaucoup (litterally: You miss to me a lot)
    the answer woul be: Tu me manques aussi. (You miss to me too)


    There is a little difference in saying it...

    In english you use the pronoun "I" (Je)
    We in french use "you" (Tu).

    Au plaisir,

     
  3. pen Senior Member

    Maryland,USA
    Honduras/Spanish
    Another zqy of literally translate it is:

    Tu me manques beaucoup = You have been missed by me
    Tu me manques aussi=You have been also missed by me:



    I hope,I did not confuse you more
    :eek:
    Pen
     
  4. Lenot New Member

    France
    "to miss" ne veut pas dire "manquer", mais "ressentir le manque de quelqu'un"
     
  5. pen Senior Member

    Maryland,USA
    Honduras/Spanish
    I still think that manquer is to miss (the lack of)
    ressentir=to feel


    Pen
     
  6. jean1938 Senior Member

    MONTRÉAL
    QUÉBEC / FRANÇAIS
    You are absolutely right Pen! :)

     
  7. talosds New Member

    Buenos Aires
    Spanish, Argentina
    To fully understand why it's "tu me manques" instead of "je te manque" as "I miss you" in English, I thought that maybe it could be said that "Tu me manques." is like saying "You're being missing to me." and that is why you use "tu" instead of "je". Would that be a correct analogy?
     
  8. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    You're being missed by me. :tick:

    I always thought of it as "You're are missing (to) me." Bad English but it helped me translate correctly to French.
     
  9. talosds New Member

    Buenos Aires
    Spanish, Argentina
    Although you're absolutely right when you say that «You are missing (to) me.» is bad English, I am not sure if a better alternative would be translating the sentence to «You're being missed by me».

    The meaning of «manquer» is not exactly that of «to miss» in English, thus there is no exact way to translate it. Using the passive voice, as you did, only results in a correct English sentence but, IMHO, it doesn't help understanding the French grammar.

    The verb «manquer» translates best to «to be missing» in this case. AFAIK, no matter how hard you try, any attempt to translate the sentence «tu me manques» literally to English will end up as a grammatically incorrect sentence.

    That's why I chose to use «bad English» instead. I honestly thought it would better demonstrate how French grammar works in this case. :)

    [...]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2010
  10. DBlomgren

    DBlomgren Senior Member

    Costa Rica
    English, USA
    [...]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2010

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