I sure hope to meet you at the interview.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by marvmen21, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. marvmen21 New Member

    SPANISH
    Hi, My native language is spanish so I am not sure if the following expressions is totally accurate in English.

    I sure hope to meet you at the interview.

    I've seen "hope to meet you soon" a lot, but I am not sure if placing "sure" before the verb is alright.

    I'd really appreciate if any native english speaker tells me if that is correct.

    Thanks.

    Marvin
     
  2. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    It sounds like you're an excitable preteen from the 1950's: "Gee whiz, that sure is neat!" "Golly, I sure can't wait for the fair!"

    In other words, it's correct, but you might want to avoid it.
     
  3. marvmen21 New Member

    SPANISH
    Thanks a lot Lucas. I really appreciate your help.
     
  4. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    As a British English speaker, I would never use "sure" in this context. Apart from sounding very American to me, it also sounds very informal, which might not be appropriate in the context of an interview.
    Personally, I would use either the quite formal "I very much hope to meet you ...", or the less formal "I really hope to meet you ...".

    By the way - welcome to the forum. :)
     
  5. marvmen21 New Member

    SPANISH
    Thank you very much. :)
     
  6. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    Marvin
    Welcome to the forum!

    You will find this forum very helpful on the finer points of language that are not to be found anywhere else, but it is essential to give us the fullest details of the context in which the language you are asking about will be used, or the source of the language.
    To give the best answer to your question we need to know who you are writing to and why. We also always like to know if there is a particular concern about American or British English, since there are some important differences. The context also helps us to advise on an important aspect of language called 'register', which means language suitable for the context - who at the interview?

    Who are you writing to saying you hope to see them at the interview? I can't think of any circumstances in which I would be writing this, even without the 'sure'.

    Lucas' imput fascinates me! I am an ancient Britess, not a young Californian, so you might not be surprised to hear that my advice is an even more emphatic "No!". I suppose I might occasionally use ' sure' instead of 'certainly' or 'very much' or some other suitable modifier, but only almost as a parody of 'typical' American speech. If I had to pretend to speak American, using 'sure' is one of the many ways I might try to create that illusion. I hadn't realised that using 'sure' is as out-dated as "gee-whizzing".

    Perhaps one of our younger native British speakers will come along to say that this use of 'sure' is alive and well among British youth. In that case, if you are writing informally to a BE friend whom you are somehow going to see when you both go for an interview, say at a university, it would perhaps be no problem to use 'sure'.

    If this is any way a formal sort of communication, it "sure" would not be fine at all.

    I am not sure about "I'm looking forward to meeting you at the interview". I'm supposing perhaps wrongly that you are the interviewee, not the interviewer. This isn't really a language question and it might not be what you were asking about. If it was, you might want to try a question about saying this if you are the interviewee. If you choose never to use ' sure' in this modifying way you will never be 'wrong'.

    :)
    Hermione
     
  7. marvmen21 New Member

    SPANISH
    Hermione, thank you very much for your insights. Now it makes sense to me. Actually I hadn't thought about all the possible scenarios (Formal, Informal, interviewee, interviewer, etc)
     
  8. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    I wouldn't use this in writing. It's too informal. It would be OK in informal speech, though, especially if you're under 25 years of age.
     
  9. marvmen21 New Member

    SPANISH
    Hermione, thank you very much for your insights. Now it makes sense to me. Actually I hadn't thought about all the possible scenarios (Formal, Informal, interviewee, interviewer, etc)
    Thanks everybody for all your insights.
     
  10. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    And, I'll say again, if you're the kind of under-25-year-old who says "Neato!" and "Golly gee!" and "Wow mister!"

    However, the phrase "that sure is a..." is less marked as retro. I would use that phrase, but not "sure" in other sentences like "I sure am looking forward to it!" or "I sure am tired!"
     

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