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I was thinking internally / innerly / inwardly..

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jexrry_nam, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. jexrry_nam Senior Member

    Hong kong
    Cantonese
    Hello there :),,

    Here is the sentence that I made.

    <When the teacher scolded me, I was thinking internally/innerly/inwardly that she is a beach.>

    I wonder if it's understandable to say this. What I want to express is that I was talking to myself without opening my mouth.

    Could anyone help me?

    Thanks
     
  2. perpend Senior Member

    American English
    I was thinking to myself ...
     
  3. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    I agree. Also, presumably you mean 'a bitch', not 'a beach'.
     
  4. jexrry_nam Senior Member

    Hong kong
    Cantonese
    Thanks perpend..

    Can't I use any of them?
     
  5. perpend Senior Member

    American English
    The difficulty is that anyone/someone could say anything/something without opening their mouths.

    You do think of these things in your mind without verbalizing them.

    EDIT: Cross-posted.
     
  6. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    <When the teacher scolded me, I was thinking internally/innerly/inwardly that she is a beach.>

    "Innerly" doesn't seem to be an existing word. The problem with all these is that they are redundant. Is it possible to "think outwardly?" Perpend's suggestion sounds best to me. Or you can say "I was telling myself".
     
  7. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    As you say, veli, there's redundancy there, because you can't "think outwardly". Even "thinking to myself" (although people often say it) is a pleonasm: you can't think to someone else — unless we accept the possibility of conscious, controlled telepathy!

    Ws:)
     
  8. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    I agree that any such phrase following "thinking" is redundant; you can't think outwardly. And of course you surely mean bitch, unless your teacher resembles a seacoast. ;)
     
  9. perpend Senior Member

    American English
    The thing is that you can "think out loud", meaning express your inner thoughts out loud. Many people are prone to do so.

    Or, you can "think to yourself" or "tell yourself". I don't find any redundancy in the context in this thread.
     
  10. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    I think we use terms like "I thought to myself" rather loosely, to represent the sort of thinking where you verbalise mentally; he was sitting there saying the words "she is a bitch" over and over to himself (as you do).

    (Agreeing with perpend.)
     
  11. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I'd be more inclined to say "I said to myself" in that case. But yes, people use both.

    (Sort of agreeing with perpend.;))

    Ws:)
     

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