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I 'wish' all the best of luck for you [transitive or intransitive?]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by a cooperator, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. a cooperator

    a cooperator Senior Member

    1- we wish you all good luck and success.
    2- I wish all the best of luck for you
    Which kind of verb is "wish" in the two sentences above transitive or intransitive?
     
  2. neal41 Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA, English
    In some dialects (mine, for example) 'you all' is used to refer to two or more persons. "You all can come in now." If you are not using 'you all' in this sense in your first sentence, leave out 'all'. "We wish you good luck and success." 'Wish' is a transitive verb and 'good luck and success' is the direct object.

    The second sentence would be better in the form "I wish you the best of luck." You could leave 'all' in it, but it is better to omit it. Here again 'wish' is transitive. In both sentences 'you' is an indirect object. Another form of the second sentence is "I wish you all the best'.
     
  3. a cooperator

    a cooperator Senior Member

    Thanks, on the other hand, in this "We wish you all the best for your future career." we can say what is being underlined is a direct object.
     
  4. neal41 Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA, English
    I would consider 'all the best' as a unit. I would not separate 'all' and 'the best'. Hence I think that 'all the best for your future career' is the direct object.
     
  5. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    To clarify, in 'wish' is transitive in both - it is ditransitive (it has two objects) in (1), and it is monotransitive (one object) in (2):

    (1) We wish [you] [good luck and success].
    (2) I wish [all the best of luck] for you.

    With a ditransitive verb as in (1), the first object is called the indirect object and the second is called the direct object. In (1) the word 'all' could belong to either object:

    (1a) We wish [you all] [good luck and success]. ("to all of you" - pitch falls on 'you all', starts higher again on 'good')
    (1b) We wish [you] [all good luck and success]. ("lots of good luck" - pitch falls a bit on 'you', starts higher again on 'all')
     
  6. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    1- we wish you all good luck and success.
    2- I wish all the best of luck for you
    Which kind of verb is "wish" in the two sentences above transitive or intransitive?

    The problem here is that "all" is not required and makes the sentence awkward. I don't know if "all" is qualifying "good luck" or means "everyone." and, in 2., you should use to instead of for - (i) we wish "the best of luck for to you" or (ii) if "all" = everyone", then "for/to you." should not be used.

    Further to entangledbank's post, the sentence has a direct and an indirect object: X wishes Y Z.

    "I give the dog a bone" - indirect object/object
    "I give a bone to the dog." object/ indirect object
    "I give him it." - indirect object/object
    to, (and, in other cases, other prepositions) are mere markers to introduce an indirect object.
     

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