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I won't judge if you don't win. ??!!

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Amber_1010, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. Amber_1010 Senior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese-Cantonese
    Hello,

    Suppose my friend is leaving for a competition so I say "I won't judge if you don't win. " to him to mean I won' think he is stupid or something if he loses.

    Is that idiomatic? That sounds kind of not so English to me.
    What would you say?

    Please help!
    Thanks!
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I've often heard "judge" used this way, Amber, and it sounds like normal English to me: I won't judge you if you don't win.

    If you don't like "judge" in the sentence, you can use some other expression: I won't think less of you if you don't win.
     
  3. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    But note owlman's correction to your sentence: I won't judge you if you don't win.
     
  4. Amber_1010 Senior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese-Cantonese
    Thank you guys :) It helped!
     
  5. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    That "you" actually isn't necessary, at least not in the slangy everyday English I hear in California. "To judge" can be used without an object, particularly since the implied object is so clear.

    I'd suggest, Amber, that you stick with "judge you" for the time being, because it seems more widespread.
     

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