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Icelandic: saeglopur

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by rachelann0, Sep 15, 2010.

  1. rachelann0 New Member

    English
    Saeglopur is the name of a song by the band Sigur Ros. The translation given is "lost at sea." However, sigur ros is known to mix made up words with icelandic words. so i was wondering, is saeglopur a real icelandic word or just one they made up?
     
  2. Silver_Biscuit

    Silver_Biscuit Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    English - UK
    I don't know if it's in actual usage (it doesn't appear in any of my dictionaries), but 'sæglópur' seems to be an amalgamation of the words:

    sær - sea
    glópur - fool, idiot

    So...

    sæglópur - sea-fool

    Perhaps it implies an unskilled sailor, someone who is foolish enough to get lost at sea, but I can't see that it literally means 'lost at sea'. Still, I could well be wrong about this - because I am not a native or fluent speaker of Icelandic. If it really does mean 'lost at sea', I'd love to know how it means that, if any of the Icelanders could explain that!
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2010
  3. sindridah Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    Icelandic
    I've only heard of "Strandaglópur" but never sæglópur, My Icelandic dictionary doesn't have the word sæglópur.

    Strandaglópur is basicly for example let's say you're on an airplane on your way to United States from UK and you get really drunk on the airplane and the crew on the airplane decides to let you off in Iceland because of your behavior, Then you are Strandaglópur in Iceland.

    So Strandaglópur is a man stopped in the middle of his way and can't get further.

    Sæglópur it sounds to me like Sigurrós are just trying to be nifty with their word choice. With suceed?, I don't know i'm not one to judge. It's not generally accepted word.

    But sæglópur has the same meaning as strandaglópur but it occurs on a sea i guess....



    And i found this:
    "Sæglópur" (Icelandic for "lost at sea") is a song by Sigur Rós, released in 2006 as a single from the 2005 album Takk.... Parts of the song are in Icelandic, although a lengthy portion is in Hopelandic, a "language" of nonsense words selected by the band that sound similar to Icelandic.

    That explains something :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2010
  4. rachelann0 New Member

    English
    Thanks a lot guys!
    It seems likely that instead of "lost at sea" it means more closely "one who is lost at sea" (thanks for the def of glópur silverbiscuit). And i couldnt find it in any dictionaries online, except for here on forvo.com (which actually gives a pronunciation as well) but I'm not sure how authoritative that is.

    (I tried to post a link but alas i am too new).
     
  5. Havfruen Senior Member

    USA
    English - American
    I guess the English translation of "Strandaglópur" is one who is stranded or even shipwrecked. Do I see a common root here? I know "strand" is beach in Danish...and it seems "stranda" is coast in Icelandic.
     
  6. Silver_Biscuit

    Silver_Biscuit Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    English - UK
    Nearly. Stranda is a verb meaning 'to strand'. It's also one of the forms (genitive plural) of the noun strönd, which does mean coast/beach. So stranda as a noun would mean of beaches or beaches'.
     
  7. hanne Senior Member

    "Strande" is the Danish verb for "to strand".
     
  8. sindridah Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    Icelandic
    I believe strandaglópur would be efternøler in Danish
     
  9. hanne Senior Member

    In that case it is a child that is born later than its siblings - an "afterthought". Which isn't the meaning you gave first (someone who's stuck halfway).
    Is it one or the other or both?
     
  10. sindridah Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    Icelandic
    Well that is what my dictionary gave me. Danish probably doesn't have that word or it is in a completely another context.
     
  11. hanne Senior Member

    So, just to clarify, "strandaglópur" has the meaning you described first (someone stuck halfway), and nothing else?
     
  12. sindridah Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    Icelandic
    No ofcourse only what i described first.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010
  13. Silver_Biscuit

    Silver_Biscuit Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    English - UK
    Strand is also 'beach' in English, of course. And German, and Dutch. I love seeing all the links between the different Scandinavian/Germanic languages!
     
  14. joopabma New Member

    Leeuwarden, Netherlands
    dutch- Netherlands
    The root is typically for germanic languages. Strand in dutch means also beach. "gestrand" means the same as in english "stranded". Inm dutch there is also the word "landloper", for someone who is astray. you see, lots of similarities here.
     
  15. Silver_Biscuit

    Silver_Biscuit Senior Member

    Reykjavík
    English - UK
    Woah, blast from the past.
     

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