1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Icelandic: takk fyrir "helping"

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by AatM, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. AatM Senior Member

    England
    English
    How would it be best to translate "thanks for helping" (a very useful phrase for here no doubt!)? My guesses would be "takk fyrir hjálpinu", "takk fyrir hjálpa" and "takk fyrir hjálp" - which one would be most natural, if indeed any of them are right?! Takk!
     
  2. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    HI AatM.

    Takk fyrir hjálpina Thanks for the help
    Takk fyrir aðstoðina Thanks for the help
    Takk fyrir að hjálpa Thanks for helping


    Hope it helps.

    Hjálp is a feminne noun, not neuter. Also, 'fyrir' here governs the accusative case and not the dative. That's why 'hjálpinu' is not correct.
    Using a noun is fine but it'd be weird without the article (as much as it would in English, I imagine: *'Thanks for help'). I think the third option in the table is what you would be best using. The present participle is most often expressed with the full infinitive in this way.
     
  3. AatM Senior Member

    England
    English
    Ef svo er, takk fyrir að hjálpa! ;P you said 'here' fyrir governs the accusative - can it govern other cases?
     
  4. AatM Senior Member

    England
    English
    (And you were right about the indefinite noun sounding odd in English too!)
     
  5. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Do you mean the preposition fyrir in general? If so, yes. There are a number of prepositions that govern either the accusative or dative case. This document is in Icelandic but there is a part that gives a list of prepositions like this (the part that says: Nokkrar forsetningar stýra bæði þolfalli og þágufalli ('Some prepositions govern both accusative and dative'). As you can see, 'fyrir' is one of them. There isn't really a clear rule and you sort of have to learn by getting used to what you see. If you look at this page then you can see how they split up the different submeanings and when it has a specific one, what it means and what case it would govern. When you look there you will see abbreviations such as e-ð and e-u, which stand for eitthvað and einhverju, which both represent ACCUSATIVE (e-ð) and DATIVE (e-u). In some different phrasal expressions they require a specific case where you can't really get it from the meaning. We can a discussion about it two years ago but didn't really come to any successful conclusions. I was quite speculative in my post and wouldn't phrase what I wrote in the same way now after more exposure and experience to this issue.

    This is probably one of the most complex things when it comes to Icelandic being complicated, so there is no need to let this bog you down at all. I found it's easier to have an open acceptance with the knowledge that you will eventually get it, rather than trying to actively tackle it at an early stage of learning.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  6. AatM Senior Member

    England
    English
    Ah, thank you, that will be a big help. I was aware of some prepositions that govern different cases but I didn't know "fyrir" was one! That will be extremely useful I'm sure!
     

Share This Page