Ich bisvere =?

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Edguoglitigin, Jun 18, 2014.

  1. Edguoglitigin

    Edguoglitigin Senior Member

    Ankara
    Turkish
    I'm studying on a medieval turkic text bilingual in German. And the author who published a dictionary on the text uses German, since he was Danish himself. But his German is archaic to some extent, because I cant take use of modern German dictionaries to figure out the meaning of the sentence nor verb bisveren. So I wonder if someone knows about the verb. Thanks!
     
  2. Schimmelreiter

    Schimmelreiter Senior Member

    Deutsch
    beschwören, rather than beschweren since the latter used to be spelt beschwæren, but I'm only guessing.
     
  3. cuore romano

    cuore romano Senior Member

  4. fdb Senior Member

    Cambridge, UK
    French (France)
    Maybe if you told us what the Turkish text says we might be able to help you. Otherwise it is just guessing.
     
  5. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Absolutely right. Please also post the entire sentence you mentioned in your question and which you identified as being in German. Who known if it is really (High) German. If the author is Danish it could be Low German or Frisian, if not a Danish dialect.
     
  6. Edguoglitigin

    Edguoglitigin Senior Member

    Ankara
    Turkish
    I've just checked another edition critique about the text and what I have found will make it clear not for me but for you all. I've arranged two quotations in the same picture which you can access below:

    http://imageshack.com/a/img840/7741/fwl.png
     
  7. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    It seems that the author of critical edition is only just guessing, like we do.:( Either beschweren (related to schwer) or beschwören (related to Schwur).

    He also adds a hypothetical word *beschwüren(related to Geschwür). I have no idea if such a word ever existed.
     
  8. eamp Junior Member

    Vienna
    German (Austria)
    The third option would rather be modern *beschwären, I think, to (now rather rare) schwären. This seems unlikely though, considering the meaning. Most likely it's either beschweren or beschwören, as said, but possibly with a different range of meaning compared to the modern words. I don't know how it could be decided without further context.
     

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