Ich habe klare Vorstellungen, wie es in den nächsten, anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Soraze, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. Soraze Junior Member

    French
    Hi,

    why do we separate the sentence here, and why is the present used after ...wie "es" in... ?

    Ich habe klare Vorstellungen, wie es in den nächsten, anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll

    I could translate by : i have a clear idea, how tough next week it will be
    I am not sure to understand why we need 2 sentences separated by the coma?

    Thanks a lot
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  2. gvergara

    gvergara Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Español
    In general, subordinate clauses are always separated from the main clause by the coma. Take a look at

    If you arrive on time, you will get good seats.

    A subordinate clause (Nebensatz in German) is a sentence which is complete in that it's got all the necessary elements to be considered a sentence on its own right (for example the sentence If you arrive on time has a subject, a verb (phrase) and an adverbial); however, it does not make sense on its own and is depedent on another sentence, the main clause (you will get good seats) In general, they are introduced by a conjunction (if in our example) In English, when you put a subordinate clause at the beginning of a sentence, as in our example, you must also separate it from the rest of the sentence by a coma. Cheers

    G.
     
  3. Soraze Junior Member

    French
    Thanks, i don't know if i get the point of your message, or if I should be more specific in my question : why, for example, don't we just use : ", wie anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll" ?
    Or, could we remove the coma and have the same meaning? "
    wie es in den nächsten anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll"
    I'm not good enough yet to understand the right meaning of the sentence above
    Thanks
     
  4. gvergara

    gvergara Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Español
    I see. The thing is, there are two comas in your original sentence. The first one (before wie) is necessary in German and separates the subordinate clause (, wie es in den nächsten, anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll) from the main clause (Ich habe klare Vorstellungen). As to the second one, I guess its role is to separate two adjectives modifying the same noun. À +

    G.
     
  5. manfy Senior Member

    Singapore
    German - Austria
    gvergara is right!
    When you remove the second comma then it slightly changes the meaning. Without comma "nächsten" is an adverb and modifies the adjective "anstrengenden". (but in this specific sentence the change of meaning is very small and probably negligible)
    e.g.
    Ich weiß, wie es in den nächsten anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll (, nämlich genauso wie in den letzten anstrengenden Wochen und den vorletzten...).
     
  6. Soraze Junior Member

    French
    Thanks, yes gvergara my guess is definitely about the second coma, not the first one ;-) I could have been more specific in the first post. So, 2 things I am still not sure about :
    1/how does it change the meaning with a coma or not? For example in English, i think you can add the adjectives one after the other, or just use "and" between 2 adjectives, the sense will remain the same, isn't it?
    2/what does "es" stand for ? As I understand the sentence, we use "soll" and "weitergehen", I am not quite sure what "es" means in the sentence ?

    Thanks again
     
  7. gvergara

    gvergara Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Español
    1) Dear Soraze, in English you CAN separate adjectives with comas when they are modifying te adjective and are considered to be at the same level (That high brick wall does not have comas because the adjectives are not at the same level: high indicates size and brick indicates material, whereas in an exciting, fun weekend both adjectives are "at the same level") How the meaning in German changes without the coma has already been discussed by manfy ;)

    2) With no further context, I would say es can be an impersonal subject not replacing any particular noun but instead referring to the situation/ the process/ the events spoken of. If you have more context, post it! ;)

    Cheers
     
  8. Soraze Junior Member

    French
    Ok, i get it now for the /1
    About "es", here is the context :

    Spieltag in der Startelf, durfte genau wie Boateng und Gomez (traf zum 4:0) Selbstvertrauen tanken. Dafür rotierte Jupp Heynckes Müller, van Buyten und Mandzukic raus.
    Heynckes: „Ich habe klare Vorstellungen, wie es in den nächsten, anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll. Es war an der Zeit, auch mal etwas zu wechseln.“
     
  9. gvergara

    gvergara Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Español
    The complete paragraph reads as follows

    Der Holländer [Arjen Robben] stand erstmals seit dem 11. Spieltag in der Startelf, durfte genau wie Boateng und Gomez (traf zum 4:0) Selbstvertrauen tanken. Dafür rotierte Jupp Heynckes Müller, van Buyten und Mandzukic raus.
    Heynckes: „Ich habe klare Vorstellungen, wie es in den nächsten, anstrengenden Wochen weitergehen soll. Es war an der Zeit, auch mal etwas zu wechseln.“

    Unless I'm outright wrong, the context comes to justify what I'd thought: es does not refer to anything in particular, but to the situation. As far as I can remember (my French is downright rotten at present), you would use ça/ cela in this case, wouldn't you? (something like J'ai envisagé comment ça/ cela doit marcher...) À +

    G.
     
  10. Soraze Junior Member

    French
    You are right, i mixed it up, i thought "es" was the verb like in spanish (this is why I was thinking of the "present" tense...), i forgot about the neutral "es" in german...! Very good point, thank you for all the details!
     

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