Ich war mit Freunden feiern

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by Hakkar, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. Hakkar Senior Member

    The Boot
    Italian
    Hello everyone. I was just reading Bild.de and I stumbled upon something which left me a little doubtful.

    This is the sentence:

    „Ich habe aus Notwehr gehandelt“, beteuert Tessa gegenüber BILD. „Ich war mit Freunden feiern, bin dann allein weiter zu einem Club gefahren. Als ich ausgestiegen bin, sah ich hinter mir einen Mann auf mich zu rennen. Er stürzte mich zu Boden und hielt meine Arme fest, aus Angst habe ich dann zugebissen.“


    I have never seen this grammatical form. What the hell is it?

    <... Moderator note: second question can be found here ...>
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2012
  2. Demiurg

    Demiurg Senior Member

    Germany
    German
    It's called "absentive" and very common in colloquial language.

    Ich bin angeln.
    Ich war schwimmen.
     
  3. Hakkar Senior Member

    The Boot
    Italian
    Hello Demiurg, thank you for replying!

    Would you mind providing more info about this? At first glance the internet has not many resources on this particular theme, I am sure you could help more.
     
  4. Demiurg

    Demiurg Senior Member

    Germany
    German
  5. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    Under the provided link we read: "The absentive is a verbal aspect that expresses an ongoing activity of an agent who is currently absent while engaging in this activity."

    My query is about absent: absent from one's home I suppose, because the subject may not be absent from the activity.
     
  6. Arukami Senior Member

    I think it exsits because there is no continuous form in German. (not really true, see below!)

    We still have something like this:
    Ich bin am lesen.
    Ich bin beim Lesen.

    If the actor is currently away, you'll use the "Absentiv".
    I've never heard about it either, however the sentence didn't seem odd to me and I would use it the same way.
     
  7. djweaverbeaver Senior Member

    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Hi,

    I've always understood this to imply that the verb "gehen" is referred to: Ich war mit Freunden feiern (gegangen). Pretty much, sein has the meaning of gehen here:
    Ich bin arbeiten = Ich gehe arbeiten
    Wir sind einkaufen gewesen= Wir sind einkaufen gegangen.
    Er war angeln= Er ging angeln

    The grammar blog Fragen an Dr. Bopp on canoo.net gives a good explanation. Additionally, this topic was also already discussed on this thread: Ich war einkaufen.
     
  8. Hutschi

    Hutschi Senior Member

    Dresden, Universum
    German, Germany
    Ich war mit Freunden feiern (gegangen).
    (because it is in the past, you can use or omit "gegangen", the facts remain the same, only the paoint of view is different.

    Pretty much, sein has the meaning of gehen here: No, it hasn't.

    Ich bin arbeiten = I am working or I went to work.
    Ich gehe arbeiten = I'm going to work - or - I`m not unemployed
    The difference to English is that it may have two meanings: 1. I have work, I'm not unemployed.

    Wir sind einkaufen gewesen= Wir sind einkaufen gegangen.
    The difference is with "gewesen" you bought something, with "gegangen" it is not clear whether it was succesful or not, maybe you bought nothing.

    Er war angeln= Er ging angeln - The difference is the same: Er ging angeln = it is not clear whether he started fishing or not. In case of "er war angeln" he actually fished.

    Of course I did not speak about lying or errors here.
    In case of "Er war" it has ended already. In case of "Er ging" it is not clear whether it started continues or ended.

    ---

    Ich war mit Freunden feiern. - is short for Ich war an einem anderen Ort und feierte dort mit Freunden. The other place is not specified. If it is here, it has to be specified. Er war hier mit Freunden feiern.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2012

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