If ifs and buts were candy and nuts

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by babyjewel, May 10, 2011.

  1. babyjewel

    babyjewel Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy, Italian
    Hi everyone, I came across this expression on an episode of The Big Bang Theory (The Apology Insufficiency).
    Sheldon: "He's responsible for the demotion of Pluto from planetary status. I liked Pluto."
    Neil: "I didn't actually demote Pluto."
    Sheldon: "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts we'd all have a merry christmas."

    I googled it and found the origin of this expression but I can't quite grasp its meaning. Can anybody help? Thanks.
     
  2. entrapta

    entrapta Senior Member

    Bologna
    Italian
    Vuol dire... così a naso che è inutile tentare di giustificarsi arrampicandosi sugli specchi...cioè con i se, i ma... etc perché valgono a poco. Qui lui non crede all'estraneità di Neil riguardo alla "demotion"
     
  3. tranquilspaces

    tranquilspaces Senior Member

    The idea is that "if" and "but" are words used very often by someone who is making excuses.

    This expression basically means, "you are trying to unnecessarily complicate this situation in order to deflect attention from what you did or didn't do."
     
  4. Spiritoso78

    Spiritoso78 Senior Member

    Tolmezzo, Friuli (I)
    Italiano e friulano
    Might it be something like?

    Con i se e con i ma non si va da nessuna parte.
     
  5. Pratolini Senior Member

    Inglese
    Per me vuol dire questo:
    La vita è piena d "ifs" and "buts", e quindi se queste parole fossero invece "candy" e "nuts" (dolci che si mangiano a Natale) ne avremmo tante da poter festeggiare il Natale come si deve.
     
  6. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    I concur with Pratolini- it means that (like tranquilspaces already mentioned), "if" and "but" are words so over-used that if each time we used one of them we were given something nice to eat, we would all grow very fat.
    I hope it's clearer by now. :)

    In the context of your conversation the phrase Sheldon says means that Neil's objection is pointless.

    P.S.: To be grammatically correct it should be "candies"! No?...
     
  7. Pratolini Senior Member

    Inglese
    La parola "Candy" è già in sé plurale.
     
  8. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Anch'io la vedo come Prato.
    "Se i "se" e i "ma" fossero ... ... ... sarebbe sempre Natale".
    GS
     
  9. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    I'm not sure if it corresponds or not, but it reminds me of a saying (not dialect) from my wife's area (nelle Marche).

     
  10. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    Thank you. :) I confess I didn't know.

    [Because I heard candies too...!]
     
  11. mirban48

    mirban48 Junior Member

    Near Milano
    Italiano
    Anche l'espressione: "Dei se e dei ma sono piene le fosse?" ha esattamente lo stesso significato, per indicare che non servono a niente.
     
  12. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Ciao, Vola.
    "candy" può funzionare da "non numerabile" (come nel nostro caso) e allora ha una sola forma. Può invece funzionare da "numerabile" ("caramella, cioccolatino, [un] dolce) e allora, se necessario, avrà il plurale "candies". Prato s'è scordato di dirtelo.
    GS
     
  13. Pratolini Senior Member

    Inglese
    Grazie Giorgio.:)
     
  14. babyjewel

    babyjewel Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy, Italian
    Grazie a tutti per le risposte!
     
  15. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    Grazie anche a te, Giorgio.
    Ma allora la mia obiezione reggerebbe! --> Perché non si usa il plurale in questo caso? :confused: Tutti gli altri sostantivi della frase sono al plurale!

    Grazie a chi vorrà darmi cortesemente una spiegazione.

    EDIT: Forse è semplicemente una frase cristallizzata così nel tempo e non dovrei farmene un problema...
     
  16. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    ;):thumbsup:

    Secondo me comunque...
     
  17. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
  18. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Candies in general are called candy. Nuts in general, are nuts.
     
  19. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    I got the message, thank you all.
    Maybe my penchant for alliteration led me astray (in this case I was looking for a perfect 4 '-s').

    @ Giorgio- thank you for your help, but I wouldn't have used the steak (singular) example, as, unlike candy, it is clearly a countable noun, and it is improbable one has more than one steak per meal, while the side is always of potatoES. :)
     
  20. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Ciao, Vola. :)

    Well, I used "steak" on purpose because it can be "countable" and "uncountable":
    1. "I think I'll have a stake, instead" = "Prenso che prenderò una bistecca, invece"
    2. "Stake is too expensive for my budget" = "Le bistecche sono troppo care per il mio bilancio"
    3. "My family never eat steak" = "I miei non mangiano mai lo spezzatino"

    Cari saluti.

    GS
     
  21. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    Let the record show that it’s spelt “steak”, ma son sicuro che lo sai veramente. :)
     
  22. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Che vergogna. Mi sta bene!:(
    Scusate tutti.
    GS
     
  23. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    Eee allora ditelooo che tutti i sostantivi in inglese possono essere sia countable che uncountable! :(

    I need a hella lot of candy to cheer me up today!
     
  24. entrapta

    entrapta Senior Member

    Bologna
    Italian
    non è proprio così....
     
  25. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Sì, non è proprio così. Infatti c'è ragione di riflettere.
    Se vedo che sulla camicetta di mia moglie c'è una macchiolina d'un giallo riconoscibile, potrei chiedere "have you been eating egg?".
    Cari saluti.

    GS

    PS Vola, hai tutta la mia solidarietà. S'impara cogli anni e con le trenate in faccia quanto siano insoddisfacenti certe "regole" nella descrizione delle lingue naturali. E' per questo che io mi guardo bene dal parlare di nomi numerabili e non-numerabili, preferendo l'espressione "usati in modo numerabile/non numerabile.
     
  26. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Well just to continue this discussion... I'd say "It looks like you got (some) egg on you." But I doubt I'd ever say ...eating egg...( with egg in the singular). I think it's more a matter of common usage, here, than any rule.
     
  27. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Certo, rrose.
    Tuttavia tu stesso hai "sentito" come naturale dire "It looks like you got (some) egg on you.", indicando tra l'altro l'opzionalità di "some", ma ribadendo l'uso non-numerabile di "egg", che si allontana dall'immagine "discreta" dell'uovo ed entra nell'area più confusa della "sostanza alimentare".
    GS
     
  28. VolaVer

    VolaVer Senior Member

    Italian - Italy
    Grazie GS. Di fatto, se le eccezioni spuntano come funghi si può parlare di regole? Hai ragione a scriverle fra virgolette.

    Quello di countable e uncountable diventa sempre più un campo minato per me e il brutto è che dovrei essere in grado di spiegarlo ai miei "studenti" adulti proprio in questi giorni...

    Le mie scuse all'iniziatore del thread per averlo portato fuori tema. :eek:
     
  29. Pratolini Senior Member

    Inglese
    Un esempio molto utile in inglese è la parola "weather" che non ha plurale.
    In italiano si dice "Che giornata!", "Che tempo!", Che uomo!", Che donna!" che sarebbero in inglese "What a day!", "What weather!", "What a man!", "What a woman!".
    La mancanza della "a" nella frase "What weather" è proprio perché "weather" è non numerabile.
     
  30. madable New Member

    English


    'If ifs and buts were candy and nuts' is a phrase that originated from football player Don Meredith. The actual phrase is 'if ifs and buts were candy and nuts wouldn't it be a merry Christmas?'.
     
  31. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks for the input, madable! (and welcome to the Forum!:)). I'd never heard of this expression. But I did think it might be connected to rhyming slang (so dear to Cockneys), and so particularly BrE.
     
  32. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    A note: with Don Meredith we’re talking American football, not calcio. I’m pretty sure this expression is not BE anyway.
     
  33. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Grazie per la dritta, Mark! I still have no clue who Don Meredith might be, but then I hate American football even more than soccer/calcio!:D
     
  34. madable New Member

    English
    "Dandy Don" Don Meredith played his entire career with the American football team the Dallas Cowboys as its Quarterback. After retiring he became one of the hosts of Monday Night Football. He also did some acting [Wyatt Earp: Return to Tombstone" was one]. He died in 2010 at the age of 72.

    Meaning: if all these reasons why we can't do something were party foods instead of words, we could have a really great party.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 2, 2013
  35. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Also the same as the older one:
    If wishes were horses beggars would ride.
     
  36. watchcat New Member

    Veneto-Italia
    italiano
    Vero ma incompleto. L'espressione intende criticare chi fa uso di 'if' e 'but' per giustificarsi e lo fa nel tipico 'Sheldon's Cooper's annoying reply that pisses you off'.

    In veneto si dice: 'se me nono el ghavese le rue el saria un careto' cioè 'se mio nonno avvesse le ruote sarebbe un carretto'. Affermazione detta da chi non accetta le tue scuse fatte di 'se' e di 'ma' e contemporaneamente vuole essere un rompipalle.
     

Share This Page