If we definitely won't win, why should we bother to play?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Sunbee, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. Sunbee Junior Member

    Korean
    Hi!
    I've heard we normally use the present tense in conditional clause and exceptionally use 'will' to express willingness.

    But I don't get why the 'will' is used in this sentence.
    "If we definitely won't win, why should we bother to play? "

    Is this the same as "If we definitely dosen't win, why should we bother to play?"

    If there is any difference, why the 'will' is used?

    Is this usage of 'will' in if-clause normally accepted?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    We wouldn't use the "doesn't" in your example, although you could use "don't" under certainly circumstances.

    The future will (won't) is used because we haven't played yet. But if we can't be guaranteed a win, why should we bother to play?

    Does that make sense?
     
  3. Sunbee Junior Member

    Korean
    Hi! Copyright.
    I'd appreciate your quick reply.

    So is this the same as "If we definitely don't win, why should we bother to play?"

    And you mean the future 'will' can be used in if-clause or it has some other meaning?
     
  4. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Well, who knows what I mean? :) I just try to figure these things out logically and I should share my findings without mentioning parts of speech. So I see it this way:

    "If we definitely don't win, why should we bother to play?" (I wouldn't use this under any circumstances I can think of at the moment -- "definitely" and "don't" don't seem to go together for me, although I'm sure I could think of some use for the combination given enough time and probably a different context -- ah, here, it comes: "I definitely don't want to do this.")
    "If we definitely won't win, why should we bother to play?" (If there is no possibility of our winning, why should we play.)
    "If we definitely can't win, why should we bother to play?" (Same as above.)
    "If we don't win, I'm not taking you guys to the Dairy Queen after the game." (Simple statement of fact.)

    All of the games are unplayed and in the future.
     
  5. Sunbee Junior Member

    Korean
    I got it.
    Thanks for your help!
     
  6. Pedro y La Torre

    Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    To be honest, the English sentence sounds a little off.

    You'd more likely hear ''if we definitely won't win, why would we bother playing?"
     
  7. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    And an opposing opinion: I like "...why should we bother..." :)
     

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