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If you will go, then you shall.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wolfbm1, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
  2. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    Yes, more or less. This is a rare example where the original difference between 'will' and 'shall' is explicitly used. If you want to go (or if you are determined to go, intent on going), then [not than!] this will happen - I declare this will happen, I will ensure it is done. Cinderella's fairy godmother told her, 'You shall go to the ball,' but she wasn't ordering a reluctant Cinderella to go.
     
  3. wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Thank you, entangledbank.
    If you will go, then you shall. = if you are determined to go (condition), you will ensure it is done (result).
     
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I don't disagree about the meaning, but I don't hear people say "If you will go, you shall". In my opinion it is not currently idiomatic and consequently not a good addition to a learner's armoury.
     
  5. wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    So thinks LeTasmanien. He also told me that I could find this construction in old texts:
    "The good news that "shall" is unfashionable these days and rarely heard and I would suggest probably best avoided unless you are studying older English texts?"
    (I hope I am right in my thinking that it is a type one conditional sentence.)
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I disagree with this. I hear affirmative "shall" all the time and use it myself. What I don't hear is "If you will go" in the sense of "If you want to go."
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  7. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    I think both have a limited but still living use in these senses: 'If you will tease that dog!' (which is not simply "want", I admit, more like "insist on"), and 'And so you shall!'
     

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