I'll catch up with you later

Discussion in 'English Only' started by roniy, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    All right guys , I'll catch up with you later"


    I have difficulty to understand the excat meaning of it.

    Can yo help me out with this ????

    I know the meaning "catch up with you"- to get someone or to be at the same point with someone.

    But what does "catch up with you later" mean?

    Here is the situation.

    when everybody is leaving one guy is saying:
    "All right guys , I'll catch up with you later"

    Does it mean " I'll see you later" ????

    Thanks.
     
  2. . 1 Senior Member

    Ferntree Gully
    Australian Australia
    Yes.
    You are correct in your interpretation.

    .,,
     
  3. roniy Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)

    All right
    got it

    thank you :)
     
  4. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    It can be used literally - e.g. if we are going down a road I might set off earlier and you can catch me up because your transport is quicker than mine, or you will run to catch me!

    Or it can mean we'll chat on the phone / email etc which is less literal.
     
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'll catch up with you later could, as suggested, be meant literally.

    In this particular example, the suggestion is that he will contact some or all of his friends later - perhaps days later - and catch up with them in the sense of getting up to date with what's been going on in their lives.

    It suggest to me that he knows they have a lot more interesting stuff to tell him about that they didn't get round to talking about, or that they will have a lot more to tell him later.
     
  6. Sallyb36

    Sallyb36 Senior Member

    Liverpool UK
    British UK
    I'll see you later means that he will meet with them again later on in the day.
     
  7. Loyalty4Life New Member

    Eugene, OR
    English, USA
    This what watching "catching up" with someone generally means...
     
  8. fontana New Member

    Chinese
    Does "catch up with you" mean "see you later" sometimes?
    I looked into dictionary and didn't find the definition like this, but I remeber I saw someboday used it this way. Am I right?
     
  9. jess oh seven

    jess oh seven Senior Member

    Scotland
    UK/US, English
    ^ to "catch up with someone" means to see someone and exchange news/events from both your lives since you last saw one another.

    eg. "We haven't seen eachother in months! We'll have to meet for a coffee and catch up sometime soon."
     
  10. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I can also mean to come alongside or to reach an equal place to:

    "I ran after him so that I could catch up with him before he got into his car."

    "Jason was lagging behind in Math this year, but we hired a tutor and he caught up with the rest of the class."

    "Caught up" can also mean involved in (sometime unwillingly) or entranced by.

    "She was so caught up in the movie she was watching that she didn't hear us enter the room."

    "He was caught up in that bankruptcy scandal and had to resign his position."
     
  11. david.escuizo Senior Member

    Working in England
    Spanish (Spain)
    I'm sorry but I don't think this is true. When I used to work, my colleagues told me when leaving "see you later" and we were sure we would not be meeting later on the day.
    For me "see you later" does not mean literally "I am going to see you later" but the same as "bye bye"
     
  12. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    It can mean both things, literally later, or just good-bye.
     
  13. vanile New Member

    english
    ok guys I need your help so :)

    so what that message means -
    "Hi, I can't talk just now. Hope you had great time in London though! I still feeling a bit sorry for myself... Will try and catch up with you later though... :)"
     
  14. david.escuizo Senior Member

    Working in England
    Spanish (Spain)
    The rules are that you first have to give it a try and say what you think it means.
    But what exactly do you want us to tell you? Because your profile sais you are an English native...
     
  15. Siagian New Member

    Indonesia
    i don't get a lot. so what is catch with you really mean? i'm sorry my english knowledge is probably very low, so what has roniy said is not really able i absorb. please reply, i wanna know the meaning, thank you.
     
  16. reka39 Senior Member

    Italian
    Hello! For example, in the context of television, if a TV host says that he 'caught up with xy' for an interview, does it imply he met 'phisically' xy or could it simply mean he interviewed (for example, also by phone) xy? Thanks for your help.
     
  17. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    In the situation you describe, all it really means is "I interviewed XY." You can't assume much more than that. The phrase "caught up" is intended to sound casual and conversational. When a regular person says this, it usually means that the conversation was at least somewhat spontaneous, but with a TV host, you never know - it could mean that the interview had been scheduled for weeks or it could mean that it came about because the host and the interview subject just happened to be at the same place at the same time (such as at a particular awards show).
     
  18. reka39 Senior Member

    Italian
    Thanks for the help. In my example, the person interviewed was a foreign actor that was coming the city where the host works for a theatre show. The host met the actor in a hotel hall. They phisically met somewhere. From your explaination I understood he could had said the same thing if he just contacted the actor by phone to ask some information. thanks!
     
  19. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    That's how I'd understand it. Here it sounds as though the host used the phrase just as a regular person would, but he doesn't have to. I mean, it's an interview show, and so of course he wants it to sound pleasant and conversational. He's not under oath or anything.
     

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