Illegible signature or illegible name in law

Discussion in 'English Only' started by n1krobe, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. n1krobe New Member

    English
    What does illegible name or illegible signature mean in formal law documents, I assume it means more than "I just can't read this sloppy handwriting so I don't care to even guess."
     
  2. Gwan Senior Member

    Indre et Loire, France
    New Zealand, English
    I can't imagine 'illegible' having any special legal sense beyond 'unreadable', but I'm no expert in the law.
     
  3. n1krobe New Member

    English
    Thanks for the reply, I'm trying to translate a Spanish birth certificate and my friend tells me that nombre ilegible means "YOU SHALL NOT FALSIFY THIS NAME" I've seen things that have s/illegible in English law texts and formal documents but I don't really know what s/illegible means.
     
  4. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    In the past, even birth certificates were written by hand with pens that were dipped in inkwells. Very often the handwriting cannot be read today (for example, I have a document concerning my great-great-grandmother, and after years of consideration I still cannot tell if her maiden name is "Brunnig" or "Brussing": either choice seems equally likely; in many cases it is even more difficult, because of faded ink and smeared letters), and it is a simple statement of fact to say "name illegible.".
     
  5. Gwan Senior Member

    Indre et Loire, France
    New Zealand, English
    Hi, I did some googling and s/ or /s/ seems to mean signed. So it would be signed: [illegible]. There is also a Spanish forum that might be able to help you. My lawyer friend has no idea :)
     
  6. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    As Gwan says, "illegible" means "unreadable".

    Of course, in a legal document, you should not try to guess a name or write in something that might be correct. In that sense, "illegible" might be a warning against making a guess and writing in whatever seems correct.
     
  7. n1krobe New Member

    English
    Awesome that cleared it up for me.

    Thanks!
     

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