I'm always happy vs I've always been happy..

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jexrry_nam, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. jexrry_nam Senior Member

    Hong kong
    Cantonese
    Hello there :),,

    'I'm always happy.'
    'I've always been happy.'

    I'm uncertain what the differences between them are.

    In my opinion, always already has the meaning of a long long time.

    Another example : I'm always late for work.

    It has the definite meaning that this isn't my first time. It has to be more than 2,3 times.

    Could anyone tell me the difference between them?

    Thanks a lot..
     
  2. powerhousebridge Senior Member

    Malayalam
    I dont know how to express the difference but I can provide 2 examples
    1) I am always happy in my life
    2) I have stayed here many times and have always been happy
     
  3. loghrat Senior Member

    Australia
    British English / Danish
     
  4. jexrry_nam Senior Member

    Hong kong
    Cantonese
    Thanks mate,,

    For the example 1 it was given, I personally think that present perfect can also fit in.

    'I've always been happy throughout my whole life.'

    Another example :

    'I've always wanted to be a teacher.'

    Apparently, 'I always want' won't fit in this case.

    Could anyone clarify this to me?
     
  5. loghrat Senior Member

    Australia
    British English / Danish
    Yes, jexrry_nam, you're right, you can't say 'I always want to be a teacher'.

    You can say:
    'I want to be a teacher':tick:
    'I've always wanted to be a teacher (ever since I was very young)':tick:

    but not:
    'I always want to be a teacher':cross:

    but you can say:
    'I always wanted (past simple) to be a teacher, but now it's too late, because I've reached retirement age!'
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013
  6. "I'm always happy" also contains a vague promise for the future whereas "I've always been happy" could imply you stop being happy from now on.
     

Share This Page