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I'm beat, flat, worn out, tired, ... Tired in AE/BE?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by comsci, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    Do you say "I'm beat!" to denote that one's "flat/worn out"? What are some other ways to express "I'm extremely tired"? Just want to know what's idiomatic that's all. :D
     
  2. renegade angel Senior Member

    English, Australia
    "I'm stuffed"

    "I'm rooted"

    "I'm exhausted"

    "I'm buggered" (very Australian =p)
     
  3. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
     
  4. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    There are many, many expressions for this. :) It must be because it's such a common experience. Here are a few off the top of my head:

    "bushed", "dead-tired", "dog-tired", "spent", "whacked", "dead on my feet", "running on empty", "running on fumes"
     
  5. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    Wow..that many eh? :) Thanks JamesM, I guess they don't teach you those in grammar or ESL books. Yikes!! That's what we're all here for. :)

    By the way, do you say "someone who's sleeping like a log" to refer to someone who's in deep sleep?
     
  6. la reine victoria Senior Member

    "Dead beat" and "knackered" come to mind. Also "shattered".





    LRV
     
  7. renegade angel Senior Member

    English, Australia
     
  8. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Yes. You can also say "sleeps like a baby" or "sleeps like the dead".

    There are dozens of expressions for "tired." Now you have my head churning on that. :)

    A few more: "bone-tired", "bone-weary", and "tired to the bone". I'll see if I can find a collection of them out there in the ether somewhere. :)
     
  9. renegade angel Senior Member

    English, Australia
    "I'm knackered"
     
  10. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
     
  11. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    Thank you again JamesM, you've been so helpful and nice. As I understand the term "to the bone" or "bone", it refers to "in great extent/depth/degree" if I'm not mistaken. :)
     
  12. la reine victoria Senior Member

     
  13. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    Thank you all as your input attested enlightening. :)
     
  14. sambistapt Senior Member

    RIO DE JANEIRO
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Hello amigos!:)

    How do I say this expression: I´m very tired in Britain and in the United states, including slangs, terms in use or even outdated? I only know the word: exhausted that could replace it.

    Thanks in advance,

    Sam:cool:
     
  15. Bobzinha

    Bobzinha Senior Member

    Baltimore-MD
    Brazil-portuguese
    beat
    UK - dead beat

    you can say "my long day of work has finished me off".....

    let's wait for more... :D
     
  16. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    Dead tired
    wiped out
    beat
    wrung out
    knocked out
    dead on one's feet
    dragging

    EDIT - note that these are terms that might be used in AE. Since most speakers of AE would have no idea what "knackered" meant (see below), I will likewise not claim that speakers of BE will know any or all of the terms above, although I suspect that they do.
     
  17. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
  18. jucami Senior Member

    USA (English)
    An American term for "tired" that I always thought was funny is "pooped."

    What a long day! Boy, am I pooped!


    We can also say "I'm worn out."
     
  19. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    Buggered.
    Fucked.
     
  20. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    As post 3 shows beat is used in AE. Dead beat has a completely different meaning, one who doesn't pay(money) his obligations.
     
  21. icecreamsoldier

    icecreamsoldier Senior Member

    New Zealand English
    Fucked = screwed, in a bind, etc; I would never use it to mean very tired in NZ English.
    That said, many people use swear words for anything and everything - just saying it's not standard usage.
     
  22. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    "Bagged" is very popular in my world.
     
  23. audiolaik

    audiolaik Senior Member

    Poland
    Poland, Polish
    Hello,

    I suggest the word shattered.
     
  24. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Does this mean "very tired" in your neighbourhood, Audiolaik?
     
  25. icecreamsoldier

    icecreamsoldier Senior Member

    New Zealand English
    Shattered is very common, meaning very tired (physically/sleepy).
    When physically tired such as after an exhausting run, I often say I'm really wasted/butchered. Careful about using wasted though, people might think you mean that you're on drugs.
     
  26. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    That's interesting because it's a synonym that I've never heard of for being very tired. I've heard all of the others but not this one. Live and learn!:)
     
  27. cfu507

    cfu507 Senior Member

    Hebrew
    Hey, some of us are still children :D

    How about: exhausted. Don't you say it?
     
  28. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I don't think we use "dead beat" for tired in BrE.

    I agree, "shattered" is fine, and very common in BrE. I see it as a more polite version of "knackered", which is what I'd usually say.

    Yes, we do, cfu :D
     
  29. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    We also have some expressions for this in BE. If someone says "You're looking tired", you could respond with You could knock me down with a feather.

    When my mother felt very tired she sometimes said I couldn't knock the skin off a rice pudding, but that was some years ago; these days it is not heard often.
     
  30. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Well, if someone says that he/she is fucked, I would think that he/she is toast, not tired. (AE)
     
  31. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    That's interesting! I use "knock me down with a feather" (especially in the phrase "you could have knocked me down with a feather") with the meaning "be astonished".
     
  32. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Your "wasted" reminds me of another similar word for tired "spent".

    You can always say "I am spent".

    Oh, another one "worn-out".
     
  33. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    To be honest, I think you're right, Loob. I'm not really awake yet. :eek:
     
  34. audiolaik

    audiolaik Senior Member

    Poland
    Poland, Polish
    I wouldn't say in my neighbourhood because I live in Poland:)!
    I picked it up from my ex-teacher, a Brit.
     
  35. cfu507

    cfu507 Senior Member

    Hebrew
    Me too, I'm not a native speaker, but I always heared "I'm fucked" and "I'm screwed" when someone wanted to say "I'm in big trubles".
     
  36. audiolaik

    audiolaik Senior Member

    Poland
    Poland, Polish
    Hello,

    What about the expression run oneself down?
     
  37. Pticru Senior Member

    Switzerland
    U.S.-- English
    my two cents: bushed and whacked were mentioned, but not "bush-whacked"!
     
  38. audiolaik

    audiolaik Senior Member

    Poland
    Poland, Polish
    Hello,

    In Australian English, as far as I remember, the word bushed means the state of being lost:)!
     
  39. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    I'm feeling a bit run down ~ I'm feeling tired and lacking in energy, maybe a bit under the weather, perhaps a bit depressed with it.
     
  40. audiolaik

    audiolaik Senior Member

    Poland
    Poland, Polish
    Hello,

    Thanks for your confirmation, Ewie:)!
     
  41. Pticru Senior Member

    Switzerland
    U.S.-- English
    oops, sorry, maybe "bush-whacked" means just "ambushed" (as opposed to "am_bushed"). My mistake. Sounded right though...
     
  42. gasman Senior Member

    Canada, English
    I'm done, is another
     
  43. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Or done in (though that can also mean murdered in BE:D)
     
  44. Broccolicious Senior Member

    Glorious Devonshire
    English - England
    Have we had 'wiped out' yet?
     
  45. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Yeah, we had that in #16, Brocco;)
    Have we had knacked though? I hear that quite a lot ~ kind of a compromise between knocked out and knackered.
     
  46. Egoexpress

    Egoexpress Senior Member

    Hungary, Hungarian
    What about "lethargic"?
     
  47. Broccolicious Senior Member

    Glorious Devonshire
    English - England
    Knacked?! That must be a Northern one!
     
  48. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Yup - that's a new one on me...
     
  49. Broccolicious Senior Member

    Glorious Devonshire
    English - England
    Egoexpress - 'lethargic' has more of a sense of not being alert, having no energy, not moving very fast. A lethargic person needn't be tired necessarily - they might just not be interested in what's going on.

    For example, I came out of a very long and dull meeting today feeling lethargic, but I wasn't tired - just bored and in need of stimulation!
     
  50. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    'Appen so, Brocco.
    Oh and there's cream-crackered (though I'm not a fan of rhyming slang).
     

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