In die/der Schule/// zur Schule (revisited)

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by popotla, May 8, 2013.

  1. popotla Senior Member

    British English
    I came across the following interesting post by Hutschi: "Gehst du schon zur Schule/in die Schule?" is used. But "Gehst du schon in der Schule?" is not used, this is blocked except in very special context. "Bist Du schon in der Schule?" could be used in the same way, but only as fixed expression with "schon".

    In relation to "Gehst du schon in der Schule?",just what is that special context? Is that when it means -though this might not be good (appropriate/correct) German- "Bist du schon in die Schule gegangen?" (z.B. Eine Mutter spricht per Telefon (Handy) mit ihrem Kind.)

    I'd like to clarify for myself the difference between Ich gehe zur Schule and Ich gehe in die Schule. Supposing I'm on the bus, etc., between home and school, I'd say "zur Schule", wouldn't I? At what point does "zur Schule" end and "in die Schule" begin? Would that be when I've passed the school gate, if there is one, or only as I'm about to go through, or am actually going through, the door?

    I've also read that "Ich gehe in die Schule" ist auch eine idiomatische Wendung ("I attend school"), though if it's being used in that way, that would normally be understood from context.

    Thanks
     
  2. Gernot Back

    Gernot Back Senior Member

    Cologne, Germany
    German - Germany
    No, why should that only be used with schon? Where did you get that from?

    Bist du schon in die Schule (hinein)gegangen?

    ... would mean:

    Have you entered/Did you enter the/this/a school building yet?

    Yes, but you wouldn't say

    Ich gehe zur Schule

    ... here, but

    Ich bin auf dem Weg zur Schule

    ..., since you are not a pedestrian but a bus passenger.

    If you are talking about Schule as an institution, it doesn't make sense to speak about school gates.
    On the other hand, if you are talking about the school building, you enter it, when you pass the door, not the gate to the school yard.

    Yes, that's the primary meaning: I attend school/I am a pupil/student.
     
  3. popotla Senior Member

    British English
    No, why should that only be used with schon? Where did you get that from?
    Thanks for your reply. I got it from a post by Hutschi on this forum. At what point does "zur Schule" end and "in die Schule" begin? Would that be when I've passed the school gate, if there is one, or only as I'm about to go through, or am actually going through, the door?
    If you are talking about Schule as an institution, it doesn't make sense to speak about school gates.
    On the other hand, if you are talking about the school building, you enter it, when you pass the door, not the gate to the school yard. //// This to me is counter-intuitive, but language often is. I can't help comparing it to English. In British English, "I'm in school" (=physically there) wouldn't be used, imo, though others may disagree. "I'm at school" includes inside the buildings, in the playground/yard, on the playing fields, etc.etc. If one was in the yard one wouldn't be on one's way to school but "at school". On the other hand, "I'm on my way to the chemistry lab" could mean that I'm in a/the building, walking along a corridor. But that's English.Thanks. (Cursor is not working for me on this page. That's why this looks so messy.)
     
  4. Gernot Back

    Gernot Back Senior Member

    Cologne, Germany
    German - Germany
    I think English is not all that different from German in this respect: If parents were calling their child on a mobile phone -incidentally- at the moment of a break between two school lessons on the school yard, of course their child would say;

    I'm at/in school.
    Ich bin in der Schule.

    ... , if he or she were asked about their location at the moment.
     

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