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in high school / at high school

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Tadeo, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    Wich would be the correct proposition at or in???
    a) Where were you??? At/In High school
    b) When I was In/at high school

    IN
    Use 'in' with spaces:
    • in a room / in a building
    • in a garden / in a park

    Use 'at' with static (non-movement) verbs and places:
    • at the cinema
    • at work
    • at home
    AT
    Use 'at' with places:
    • at the bus-stop
    • at the door
    • at the cinema
    • at the end of the street
    I don't get it because high school is a non-movement place, but it is also an space:(
     
  2. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    Why do we say :

    stay in school and not stay at school ¿?

    I really need this guys!!! Thanks.
     
  3. emblazingstar New Member

    us english
    a. Where were you? I was at school.
    b. When I was in high school...

    Stay in school implies don't drop out of school.
    Stay at school implies don't leave the campus.
     
  4. panorama Senior Member

    English & español / EE. UU.
    "In school" por lo general se refiere a la condición de estudiante por un periodo prolongado; es el equivalente de SER alumno.

    "At school" se refiere al lugar en donde uno se encuentra al momento; es el equivalente de ESTAR en la escuela.
     
  5. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    So in acts as place-time-condition

    and

    at acts just as an specific place right.

    Same with:

    Stay in the hotel (be a guest)
    Stay at the hotel (stay in the facilities)
    ¿?

    Thank you!!!
     
  6. fool4jesus Senior Member

    Sort of, but it depends on the particular noun. "In school" has the specific meaning of being enrolled in the school. On the other hand, with the noun "beach", you have:

    at the beach (staying in the town where the beach is)
    on the beach (actually standing on the sand)

    Also, "in the hotel" means that you are standing inside the building, not necessarily that you're a guest. "In" or "at" the hotel are pretty much equivalent: it's the verb ("stay" vs. "eat") that makes the difference here.

    The moral is: Don't try to make too strict a rule. English won't follow it.
     
  7. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    Also, "in the hotel" means that you are standing inside the building, not necessarily that you're a guest. "In" or "at" the hotel are pretty much equivalent: it's the verb ("stay" vs. "eat") that makes the difference here

    Thank you fool4jesus; but can you explain me that verb issue?;I don't get it.

    One more thing, the rule in my first post, can change with common usage, and it will depend of the context right???
    So can I say in the park and also at the park ¿?
     
  8. fool4jesus Senior Member

    All I mean is that in this case, the preposition doesn't really make any difference. If I say

    We're staying at the hotel.
    We're staying in the hotel.

    They mean basically the same thing: we're guests there. Similarly,

    He's eating at the hotel.
    He's eating in the hotel.

    both mean that he's just in the hotel. There might be a slight matiz (ob: Spanish) of difference in that "eating at the hotel" implies he's eating in the hotel's restaurant, if it has one, while the latter could just mean he's eating inside the building. But I don't think there's really much of any difference.
     
  9. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    Thank You again to all of you.

    One last thing:

    the rule in my first post, can change with common usage, and it will depend of the context right???
    So can I say in the park and also at the park ¿?
     
  10. fool4jesus Senior Member

    Yes, "In the park" and "At the park" are basically the same, if we're talking about a town park with grass and trees. If there's a difference, "in" implies within the boundaries of the park vs. being outside the boundaries, where "at" does not say anything about in vs. out. This would come up in the context of a baseball game, an "in the park" homerun vs. "out of the park" - although that's not really quite the same because the "park" here is la cancha, not el estadio.

    No sé si todo esto ayuda o no ...
     
  11. Tadeo Senior Member

    Español (México)
    It's very helpful indeed.
    I'm starting to think that I should not abide by the rules completely.
     
  12. The_Calling Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish-Spain
    Hello nice people, I have a doubt which always confuses me and I don't know when I should say: at/in in this kind of contexts, for instance:

    Someone.- Are you studying? where?
    Me.- Yes, I am, I study at/in H. S.

    Or.. I study at/in university..I study in/at School..or.. I work in/at "somewhere"..in this last one, does it depend where you work to use these prepositions?..please help me when I should use work in/at.

    Thank you in advance.

    PS: Sorry for my grammar, if I have a mistake please correct me. Thank you!
     
  13. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    I'm in high school = estoy inscrito en una escuela secundaria
    I'm at high school = estoy en la escuela, ahora, físcamente

    En grandes líneas, y sin que todo el mundo respete mis reglas.

    I work in public relations/computer programming/financial services
    I work at the X company
     
  14. elirlandes

    elirlandes Senior Member

    Dublin & Málaga
    Ireland English
    You would usually say:
    I am in high school.
    I am in university.
    I study economics at the University of X.

    You would not say "I study at high school / university".


    I work in [placename]. I work in Mérida / the financial district / a big building / the bank.

    I work at [company name]. I work at Telefónica / Renfe / Banco X.
     
  15. miguelT Senior Member

    USA
    inglés-USA
    In the US, nobody says "I am in university". We say "I am in college" or "I go to the University of Maryland", or whatever the name of the university is. (or "I study at the University of Maryland")
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2009
  16. carolinamunoz Junior Member

    British english is used " at university"/"at college"/"at work",etc
    i study at university.
    I work at somewhere.
     
  17. The_Calling Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish-Spain
    Thank you everybody! it helped me a lot! ^^
     
  18. Dark Fairy Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina Castellano
    Si quiero decir "Estudié en tal colegio" (secundario)
    I studied... in? at?... X school?
    Por ejemplo... I studied in/at Pellegrini ¿School?
     
  19. koxol Senior Member

    I went to Pellegrini Highschool.
     

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