"In the instance" the same as "in this instance"?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Frigolin, Jun 29, 2006.

  1. Frigolin

    Frigolin Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina - Español
    Hi there, again!
    Is "in the instance" the same as "in this instance"? Here´s the context:

    In any particular interactional text, however, they may not figure among the latter, denotationally explicit machinery in the instance (the nonregimenting role of deixis in many rituals comes inmediately to mind).

    Thanks!!:D

    Frigos
     
  2. lian.alon22 Senior Member

    US
    US-English
    in this instance are basically the same thing. it is more common to see "In the instance of..." and "...in this instance." otherwise, they are identical in meaning.
     
  3. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    This sentence is quite something! It is not, however, grammatically correct. To make it simpler (because I have no clue what the sentence means), let's omit the adjectives:

    In any text, however, they may not figure among the latter, machinery in the instance.

    This sounds like a sentence fragment to me, not a complete sentence. What exactly does this mean?
     

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