1. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Context: New York in 1776.
    Quote:
    Broadway, straight and wide, was the grand thoroughfare lined with shade trees and fine houses and churches. Queen Street, close to the crowded East River wharves, was the bustling business center. City Hall stood on Wall Street, or "in" Wall Street, as people said.

    Is there a reason why people used "in" only when referring to Wall Street?
     
  2. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    I wasn't aware that Wall was such a special street that it took "in" as a preposition rather than "on". Perhaps the author is saying (not very clearly) that people at that time used the preposition "in", rather than the modern "on".
     
  3. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Thank you, Fenixpollo. You make a good point, and strictly speaking the meaning could be ambiguous, but the author is a good enough writer to not make that mistake. If he had wanted to say that New Yorkers used "in" instead of "on" when referring to streets, he would have worded it differently.
     
  4. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod, I say, Moderator

    Arizona
    American English
    Well, perhaps you're right, FC, that a better writer would say "...as people used to say in those days." However, even though "...as people said" is less clear or specific, it means the same thing.
     

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