Inadequate to the task

Discussion in 'English Only' started by aisha93, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. aisha93

    aisha93 Senior Member

    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    Hi everybody,

    What does this phrase mean: inadequate to the task?

    And can you give me some examples please?

    Thanks
     
  2. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    We're rather keen on dealing with words in contexts here, Aisha.
    All it takes, though, in this case, is to look up the word "adequate" in our dictionary:

    (if it doesn't help, please provide the sentence in which you found it. You also have to name the source.

    inadequate/ɪnˈadɪkwət/
    adjective
    • 1 lacking the quality or quantity required; insufficient
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  3. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    Please tell us where you saw or heard this phrase and provide some context for it.
     
  4. aisha93

    aisha93 Senior Member

    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    I found it while I was searching for the word "inadequate" in Google Dictionary

    in·ad·e·quate
    adjective /inˈadikwət/ 


    1. Lacking the quality or quantity required; insufficient for a purpose
      • - these labels prove to be wholly inadequate
      • - inadequate funding


    2. (of a person) Unable to deal with a situation or with life
      • - a sad, solitary, inadequate man
      • - I felt like a fraud, inadequate to the task

     
  5. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I see how you can have trouble understanding it, Aiska. See this meaning of 'fraud':

    a person who pretends to have qualities, abilities, etc. that they do not really have in order to cheat other people (OALD)

    Your sentence means: I felt I was not the right person to do the task. I felt I was incapable of doing the task.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  6. aisha93

    aisha93 Senior Member

    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    Yes, actually my problem was the first clause, but I asked about the second because I thought if I understand it correctly then it would clarify the first one automatically.

    You're right, I found that the phrase "I feel like a (noun)" is pretty common in English as in: I feel like a failure in college.
    I feel like a failure as a mother...etc.

    Thank you.
     

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