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inherent to / inherent in

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by keumar83, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. keumar83

    keumar83 Senior Member

    Villeurbanne
    French
    Hello,

    Can a native tell me if the use of "in" is correct here? WR dictionary only lists "to" but "in" seems quite widespread too.

    Thanks
     
  2. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    An example:

    Inherent in the idea/policy of X is a belief in Y.

    "Inherent to" would also work in this example. I suspect the two phrases are interchangeable. In my experience "inherent in" is more common. There is sometimes a reluctance in English to seem to repeat the idea of "in" (e.g. "include me in" is often said to be misuse, though I can think of examples where it is the simplest way of saying something) but even if that problem applies here common usage ignores it.
     
  3. keumar83

    keumar83 Senior Member

    Villeurbanne
    French
    Thanks a lot clairet ! I'll keep the "in" in the sentence then.
     
  4. focoso New Member

    Australia
    Australian, British English
    One may also say 'inherent of...'.
     
  5. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    I think inherent of sounds very strange. A regional difference, perhaps?
     
  6. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    I agree. It's certainly not BE either.
     

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