Intruding sounds in phonology [w, r, j between vowels]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by inib, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Having read a few examples, I can hear the intruding /w/ in do w it, the /r/ in the area r is, and the /j/ in I j agree. In these examples, the intruding sound arises between vowel sounds. I imagine this is always the case. A pupil has asked me about this phenomenon, and though I've found plenty of examples, I can't find any rules regarding in which cases one or other intruding sound appears. Can anyone help?
    Many thanks for reading this.
     
  2. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2011
  3. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks for the links, Cagey - nice long ones to save for a rainy day:D
    I always think of these as unintended consequences of how the mouth must move between the two sounds where the "intrusion" (linking) occurs. One either creates a glottal stop (or similar term) to break the flow of sound or introduces a longer silent pause - the "gap" between the words is put in "actively", so to speak. The quick glance at the links suggests that this frowned upon by some, but I suspect one's pronunciation is picked up from the surroundings - plus any corrections from frowning parents!
     
  4. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Many thanks, Cagey. I did search for threads before asking the question, but I never found these ones. Just in case anyone else is now wondering about it, I found the answer to my question in a very interesting post by Alxmrphi:

    He also attached in the same post a diagram which clarifies which are the high/low/front/back vowels, so my query has been answered very fully, and I've still got more fascinating reading to do.
    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2011
  5. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    That's a thorough description of the conditions when sounds occur in succession to create the insertions. I wouldn't, however, say they are "rules" . They will help you understand, when you hear one, that the insertion is not a separate letter.
     
  6. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    (Just posting a link to the Alxmrphi post mentioned by inib in post 4: click:).)
     

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