irá/iría a la fiesta si tenía/tuviera tiempo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Perrito, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. Perrito

    Perrito Senior Member

    Estats Units
    Estats Units, anglès
    1) Juan me dijo que iría a la fiesta si tuviera tiempo.

    2) Juan me dijo que irá a la fiesta si tenía tiempo.

    I don't really understand the difference between these two tenses.

    In the first one, does he end up going, does he have time?

    In the second one, does he end up going, does he have time?

    Maybe if I could see a translation to English, I would be able to understand it better. These parts of "la gramática española" are very confusing for me, ha ha!
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    1) This is "Juan told me that he would go to the party if he had time." We don't know if he did have time, so we don't know if he went or will be able to go.

    2) This one doesn't sound quite right to me. Perhaps "si tiene tiempo" would work. "Juan told me that he will go if he has time." Again, we don't know whether he will have time. In this case, however, we know that the party is still in the future.
     
  3. Perrito

    Perrito Senior Member

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    Estats Units, anglès
    Hello Chris K, thanks for the response. On the worksheet that I am trying to complete they have put: si tenía tiempo. Then on the one below they have put: si tuviera tiempo. I just can't tell the difference between the two. I understand si tuviera tiempo, but si tenía tiempo? For instance, Juan told me that he would go to the party "if he was having time." That sounds odd to me in English? ¿Alguien por aquí se atreve a explicarmelo? Thanks!
     
  4. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Tenía would be "(if) he had (time)"; you don't need to translate it with "was having." I will defer to a native speaker on this, but using tenía that way (especially after the future tense irá) sounds very suspect to me.
     
  5. Perrito

    Perrito Senior Member

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    Estats Units, anglès
    I agree Chris K, if he was having time sound odd. But, then in English how do we differneicate between: si tuviera tiempo and si tenía tiempo. Both get translated as: if he had time. Maybe this is a case in which Spanish is a tad bit more specific than English. I have double checked the paper several times, and this is exactly what it is asking, it's not a typo on my behalf. Maybe, it's a trick question and the professor will want me to cross it out, err...
     
  6. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    We don't differentiate in English:

    He said he'd come if he had time. (si tuviera)
    He came if (better "when") he had time. (cuando tenía)
     
  7. Perrito

    Perrito Senior Member

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    Estats Units, anglès
    So, Juan me dijo que iría a casa cuando/si tenía tiempo. I can basically replace si with cuando?

    Greg
     
  8. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Well, if you did the meaning would be different. It would no longer be conditional. He would have promised to go when he had time.
     

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