Irish Gaelic: Which does not kill me, makes me stronger

Discussion in 'Other Languages' started by ionandoni, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    I would like to know the translation of the following sentence to Irish Gaelic,

    "Which does not kill me, makes me stronger"

    Thank you very much
     
  2. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello
    Welcome to the forums. It would be nice if you made an attempt which we could then correct.
    By the way in English it'd be more usual to say :"What does not kill me makes me stronger."
     
  3. MkRoz Senior Member

    MADRID|GALICIA?/WI-TX?..Surprise!!
    Spanish-Madrid(Castellano/Galego);US.E.

    WELCOME TO THE FORUM!!

    Try, too in the General Vocabulary Forum, if you get some replies!!

    Regards,
    Mk
     
  4. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello again,
    I done a little further browsing on your behalf :
    What Nietzsche really said was "Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker."
    Careful, some websites give the following translation : "What does not destroy me, makes me stronger."
    Out of simple curiousity why would you wish to translate this phrase into Irish ?
    Adding a third (unrelated) language to the equasion seems a little dodgy to me. Please, don't tattoo this on your arm, without getting a native speaker's approval. ;)

    PS. Again purely out of curiousity, how would you say it in Spanish?
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2009
  5. MkRoz Senior Member

    MADRID|GALICIA?/WI-TX?..Surprise!!
    Spanish-Madrid(Castellano/Galego);US.E.
    Hello, Gaels!!

    If you wish to be considered like " A real Gael ".

    Which does not kill me, makes me stronger! into Spanish:
    ¡Lo que no mata, hace a uno más fuerte! (It´s an expression).

    Regards,
    Mk
     
  6. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    Thank you all,
    In Spanish we say "Lo que no me destruye, me hace mas fuerte", that is like the second option you gave " What does not destroy me, makes me stronger".
     
  7. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
    This is to be taken with caution - hopefully a fior-Gael will happen along and improve it.

    "An rud nár mharóidh mé, neartóidh mé"
     
  8. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    I tried in the General Vocabulary forum as MkRoz suggested and they have deleted it... :(
     
  9. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    The General Vocabulary forum is part of the Spanish-English section. This is the proper forum for Irish. Unfortunately, we don't get Irish speakers here often. Be patient.
     
  10. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    What about "an rud nach dtugann mo bhás dom, neartaíonn sé mé"? Which is the difference between the two?
    Thanks!!
     
  11. Frank78

    Frank78 Senior Member

    Saxony-Anhalt
    German
    Original:"Aus der Kriegsschule des Lebens - Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker."

    What does not destroy me, makes me stronger

    This obviously seems to be the "official" translation. Has anyone read Nitzsche in English to prove?

    I´ve also read "That which does not kill me, makes me stronger" and even "Whatever does not...".

    Literal translation of the whole quotation:
    From military college of life:
    What does not kill me, makes me stronger"
     
  12. MkRoz Senior Member

    MADRID|GALICIA?/WI-TX?..Surprise!!
    Spanish-Madrid(Castellano/Galego);US.E.
    Thank you, Iona for your try in the other Forum!

    I told you that because maybe if there are some Hispanos/as-Irlandenses-Gaels in that Forum could at least to guide you where to set your post.
    Anyway, as Goidels say:
    Some of the Celts follow the path of "Tãr n-aill(mell);Tãr (-innambão/-na-nog)", so that´s why it´s hard to find them!!

    Regards to everyone,

    MkRoz
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2009
  13. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Dia daoibh,
    Well good question, Where to begin?

    Both Maraigh (verb for kill) and neartaigh verb for strenghten (reinforce) are very similar ; regular verbs of the second conjugation (An Dara Réimniú). Which simply means the stem of the verb has more than 1 syllable.
    Firstly, Dlyons has used the future tense (Aimsir Fháistineach), while you have chosen the 3rd person singular of the present tense (Aimsir Láithreach) of both verbs.

    You both differ on the choice of relative pronoun as well.
    The relative pronoun "nár" is usually followed by lenition (Séimhiú) signified by the letter "h" in written Irish.
    As I understand it, nár (negative relative verbal) is used with regular verbs in the past tense. So perhaps Dlyons should have said "An rud nach mharóidh mé, neartóidh mé" Be aware, that I'm no expert on the subject.

    Effectively 'eclipsis' is used following the relative pronoun "nach"
    Though it is not used with regular verbs in the past tense ; but since "tabhair (give / bring) is an irregular verb you may still be correct.
    However you had still better wait for a native speaker's input on that issue, as Dlyons suggested, as my Irish certainly isn't up to the sort of standard required.

    Slán go fóill,

    ps. Don't know if others find it a struggle to write as Gaeilge without the broad vowels (a, o, u, á, ó, ú) & slender ones (e, i, é, í) on their keyboards.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2009
  14. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland
    Thanks for that L'irlandais! I've just come across a thread at:
    http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/viewtopic.85372.html

    My memory is that "nár" used in the conditional (i.e. that which would not kill) whereas "nach" is more "that which does not kill". But quite possibly I'm wrong.

    I don't find writing as Gaeilge any harder than Spanish. If I really want accents, I type in Word which has a relatively simple CTRL+accent scheme.
     
  15. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    It is quite difficult to me to follow all these explanations, I do not know any Irish!! So the thing is that one is in the future and the other in the past?
    An what about using mé or mo bhás dom in the first part of the sentence and mé or sé mé? I am a little bit lost!!

    Thank you for your help
     
  16. elirlandes

    elirlandes Senior Member

    Dublin & Málaga
    Ireland English
    An rud nach/nar mharóidh mé, neartóidh mé:
    I agree that "nár" is for past or conditional tenses, not future.
    I find there is ambiguity here in the objects/subjects of your verbs: "Neartóidh mé" for example would more usually mean "I will strengthen". I would read this translation back into English as "The thing that I do not kill, I strengthen"...

    That said, mo chuid ghaeilge is not fresh enough to find a fix, so I propose a way which sound more natural to me:

    Rud nach bhfuil i ndonn mé a mharaigh, tabharfaidh sé neart dom.
    The thing that is incapable of killing me, it will give me strength.
    literally:
    thing not be able me to kill, will give [it] strength [to me]

    I have to agree with L'Irlandais [my french counterpart ;) ]... it is wise NEVER to tattoo anything in Irish on your arm that has been translated from another language as what may sound clever in English/German etc. will often sound very contrived in Irish if translated literally. As you can see from my translation above, what sounds natural in Irish to explain the concept sounds totally unnatural in English.
     
  17. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    Guau!!!This is a world!!Someome gave me this other translation:an rud nach dtugann mo bhás dom, neartaíonn sé mé. What do you think about it? Is it also literally transalted or does it have sense?
    I am really grateful, thank you for the help!
     
  18. ionandoni New Member

    Spanish
    Has anybody any other suggestion?
     
  19. jamesosullivan Junior Member

    Republic of Ireland
    UK English
    I'd say

    Aon rud nach mharódh mé, neartódh mé-but i'm not sure
     
  20. Conchúr Senior Member

    Ireland - Irish, English
    Yikes! This thread is a bit confusing. Before I clear up grammatical issues, the best translation is

    An rud nach maraíonn mé, neartaíonn sé mé

    ====

    The biggest confusion in this thread is nach/nár, the reason being that they are both serve THREE linguistic purposes: they can be an interrogative verb particle, and they can be a relative particle, and they are the negative form for indirect statements (that would use go/gur in the affirmative). Unfortunately, their use isn't uniform across the tenses.

    Present
    Nach is the interrogative verb particle (Nach ndéanann tú d'obair?)
    Nach is the relative particle (An fear nach ndéanann a obair)
    Nach is the negative form of 'go' (Dúirt sé nach ndéanann tú d'obair)

    Conditional
    Nach is the interrogative verb particle (Nach ndéanfa sin dom?)
    Nach is the relative particle (An fear nach ndéanfadh an obair)
    Nach is the negative form of 'go' (Dúirt sé nach ndéanfadh sé é)

    Past
    Nár is the interrogative verb particle EXCEPT for some irregular verbs, for which it's nach (Nár ól tú an tae ? Nach ndearna tú sin dom?)
    Nár is the relative verb particle EXCEPT for some irregular verbs, for which it's nach (An fear nár ól an tae / An fear nach ndearna an obair)
    Nár is the negative form of 'go' EXCEPT for some irregular verbs, for which it's nach (Dúirt sé nár tú ól an tae / Dúirt sé nach nach ndearna an fear an obair)

    So basically, nach is always used for PRESENT and CONDITIONAL, nár is mostly used for PAST, despite some exceptions.

    THE ONLY TIME WHEN NÁR IS USED IN THE CONDITIONAL, IS WITH THE COPULA, WHICH DOESN'T APPLY HERE.
    If you wanted to put the sentence in the conditional is would be "An rud nach maródh mé, neartódh mé.

    Another big question mark is whether the subject (sé) can be left out in the second bit. Arguably, it could because

    1) An rud nach maraíonn mé, neartaíonn mé DOES NOT mean ...I strengthen , but strengthens me. If it were the former, it would be neartaím.

    2) Similarly, in the conditional, it would be neartóinn.

    This said, I would keep the second subject in, as Irish, unlike French and English, seems to prefer it to be repeated.

    Hope this clears things up.
    C
     
  21. Conchúr Senior Member

    Ireland - Irish, English
    :cross: No aspiration after 'nach'.

    I quite like this translation. It's less literal, but longer, I guess. Though it should be a mharú

    Same as above, no aspiration after 'nach'.

    Beir bua!
     
  22. elirlandes

    elirlandes Senior Member

    Dublin & Málaga
    Ireland English
    Conchúr is correct of course... my mistake earlier.

    Rud nach bhfuil i ndonn mé a mharú, tabharfaidh sé neart dom
     
  23. jamesosullivan Junior Member

    Republic of Ireland
    UK English
    Dia Dhuit a Chonchúr
    Yes I'd agree with you on most counts except for the bit about being able to say neartaíonn mé ( without the sé )
    I live in Munster but I have a friend from Dublin and she always uses the 'tu' 'sé' 'sibh' part of the verb when referring to the first person plus mé
    Sorry I know that sounds complicated-I mean she would say feiceann mé in the place of feicim. I knew that was possible but I didn't realise it was widely spoken in at least one dialect until I met her. Therefore, wouldn't it be possible to understand 'neartaíonn mé' as I strengthen? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    I'm also just looking at my last thread and have seen that while I wrote 'nach mharódh mé' you wrote 'nach maródh mé'. Is this because the nach imposes an úrú therefore negating the séimhiú used in regular conditional clauses?
    Thanks for any help. :)
     
  24. jamesosullivan Junior Member

    Republic of Ireland
    UK English
    Oh sorry just looked up-thanks for answering my question-already! :L
     

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