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Irish: Ni bheidh mo leitheid ann aris

Discussion in 'Other Languages' started by Wordsmyth, Sep 18, 2008.

  1. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Could anyone tell me the meaning of the Irish "Ni bheidh mo leitheid ann aris" ?

    I can't provide much in the way of helpful context : it's simply the signature of a member of a certain well-known and well-respected language forum ;). My only motivation is that every time I see one of her posts, my curiosity knows no bounds.

    I've searched a number of online Irish-English dictionaries, but can't put the results together to make anything meaningful.

    I could of course send the author a PM, but thought that there may be other members as curious as I am.

    W:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2008
  2. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    The internet knows: [1], [2].
     
  3. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Many thanks for that, Capn

    The crazy thing is I had already Googled for it (I thought :confused:), without finding those links. Maybe your search pushed them up the list of 567 results ;): they're now the top two ... and my WR post is fourth :eek:. Google's algorithms have always been a mystery.

    Thanks again

    W:)
     
  4. Banbha

    Banbha Senior Member

    Cork, Ireland
    Irish & English
    Incase you have not found it yet it just means ''the likes of me will never be there again''. It became a well known phrase after the population of an Island (the Blasket Island, County Kerry) was evacuated in 1953. The Island has not been populated since and its a UNESCO world heritage sight now. One of the most famous authors frm the Island said it in his book because he knew that life would never be the same again on the Island Nowadays you can buy T-shirts and stuff with that on it;)
     
  5. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Go raibh míle maith agat, Banbha

    I found the translation via CapnPrep's links, but your excellent background story gives it a new significance. Thanks for that.

    W:)
     
  6. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    If I were a skite, I'd ask whether a heritage sight is a site with more to see.
     
  7. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Hi Brioche,

    I have a question about "skite" : new topic, so it's in a new thread
     
  8. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    LOL! I've just accidentally come across this thread guys :D You do realise, don't you, that it would've been a hell of a lot easier and quicker to email me, right? I don't bite, I promise, and I'm happy to reply to any emails ;)

    But anyway, now that you know, I hope your curiosity is satisfied. In Google hits for this phrase, sometimes you'll see that "ann aris" has been changed to "aris ann". This doesn't change the meaning of the phrase, in case you were wondering. It might also account for why you didn't find any hits the first time you looked, since "aris ann" is probably more common.

    Nollaig shona :)
     

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